Spotlight Poetry – Buckingham Palace – A poem by A. A. Milne

Buckingham Palace by A. A. Milne

They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace –
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.

Alice is marrying one of the guard.
“A soldier’s life is terrible hard,”
                                     Says Alice.

They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace –
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.

We saw a guard in a sentry-box.
“One of the sergeants looks after their socks,”
                                     Says Alice.

They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace –
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.

We looked for the King, but he never came.
“Well, God take care of him, all the same,”
                                     Says Alice.

They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace –
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.

They’ve great big parties inside the grounds.
“I wouldn’t be King for a hundred pounds,”
                                     Says Alice.

They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace –
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.

A face looked out, but it wasn’t the King’s.
“He’s much too busy a-signing things,”
                                     Says Alice.

They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace –
Christopher Robin went down with Alice.

“Do you think the King knows all about me?”
“Sure to, dear, but it’s time for tea,”
                                     Says Alice.

A. A. Milne is better known for writing the story of Winnie- the-Pooh.

Pooh’s fictional friend Christopher Robin is found here in this poem too. Christopher Robin was the name of the writer’s son.

Poem Attribution © A. A. Milne, Buckingham Palace

Source Attribution https://allpoetry.com/Buckingham-Palace

View more Spotlight Poetry

Music Attribution © Webster Booth, (Song from “When we were very young” by A A Milne, set to music by Harold Fraser-Simpson, 1942)

Video Attribution duettists

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCGMwrPPG7M

More music from the Music Box

Painting Attribution © Patrick O’Callaghan, Changing the Guard…, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Changing-the-Guard/678622/2155128/view

Thank you for your visit

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Paintings – Poetry – Music – Quotation – Monday’s Round-up Read, View and Listen – Selected by Goff James

Painting 1 Attribution © Éadaoin Glynn, The Music of the Wind and I am but a Feather in it, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution  https://www.saatchiart.com/print/Painting-the-music-of-the-wind-and-I-am-but-a-feather-in-it/1433897/7514583/view

Haiku and senryu Attribution, Goff James, Hidden In His Tears, Powerless He Stands

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Painting 2 Attribution © Ira Kolodistaya, Faded memories, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Faded-memories/1377183/6751167/view

View more paintings from the Spotlight Art Gallery

Music Attribution © Louis Armstrong & Ella Fitzgerald, Dream A Little Dream Of Me, (Sy Oliver Orchestra), 1931 song with music by Fabian Andre and Wilbur Schwandt and lyrics by Gus Kahn

Video Attribution JazzMusicHD

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxrws7omOHQ

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Music Box – Dream A Little Dream of Me – Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald (Sy Oliver Orchestra)

Music Attribution © Louis Armstrong & Ella Fitzgerald, Dream A Little Dream Of Me, (Sy Oliver Orchestra), 1931 song with music by Fabian Andre and Wilbur Schwandt and lyrics by Gus Kahn

Video Attribution JazzMusicHD

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxrws7omOHQ

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Paintings – Poetry – Music – Quotation – Monday’s Round-up Read, View and Listen – Selected by Goff James

Painting 1 Attribution © Changsoon Oh, Silence 15, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Silence-15/45266/176563/view

Poem 1 Attribution © Delmore Schwartz, The Choir And Music Of Solitude And Silence

Source Attribution https://www.poeticous.com/delmore-schwartz/the-choir-and-music-of-solitude-and-silence

Senryū 1, 2, Attribution, Goff James, Old Books on the Shelf, Head in the Clouds

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Painting 2 Attribution © Katja Wittmer, In Hiding, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-In-Hiding/1607987/7738656/view

Music Attribution © Marion Grimaldi and the Williams Singers, We’ll Gather Lilacs, Written by Ivor Novello

Video Attribution gercha88

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY8NrX6zY5M

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Music Box – We’ll Gather Lilacs – Marion Grimaldi and The Williams Singers

About the Song

We’ll Gather Lilacs, also called We’ll Gather Lilacs In The Spring, is a song by Welsh composer Ivor Novello which he wrote for the hit musical romance Perchance to Dream.

The stage musical opened at the Hippodrome Theatre in London’s West End in 1945 and ran until 1948. The song, sung in the show by Olive Gilbert,[1] was the most popular and enduring to emerge from the production.

The song was originally recorded by Muriel Barron & Olive Gilbert (1945) and by Geraldo and his Orchestra, who reached the UK charts with it in 1946.

A recording by Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra (vocal by Stuart Foster) was a minor hit in the USA in 1946.

We’ll Gather Lilacs has since been performed by many artists, including notably Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth, Richard Tauber and Bing Crosby.

Frank Sinatra (for his album Sinatra Sings Great Songs from Great Britain (1962), Marion Grimaldi and Julie Andrews.

Written as World War II drew to its close, the song describes the yearning of parted couples to be reunited.

The song evokes the joy they would feel when together once again, and the pleasures of the English countryside in spring with its lilac blossom.

The song was performed at Novello’s cremation in 1951 by Olive Gilbert It was also used in the 1954 film Lilacs in the Spring.

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We%27ll_Gather_Lilacs

Ivor Novello (1893 – 1951) was a Welsh composer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the first half of the 20th century.

Novello (David Ivor Davies) was born into a musical family, and his first successes were as a songwriter.

Novello’s first big hit was “Keep the Home Fires Burning” (1914), which was enormously popular during the First World War.

Novello’s 1917 show, Theodore & Co, was a wartime hit.

After the war, Novello contributed numbers to several successful musical comedies and was eventually commissioned to write the scores of complete shows. He wrote his musicals in the style of operetta and often composed his music to the libretti of Christopher Hassall.

In the 1920s, Novello turned to acting, first in British films and then on stage, with considerable success in both.

Novello starred in two silent films directed by Alfred Hitchcock, The Lodger and Downhill (both 1927).

On stage, Novello played the title character in the first London production of Liliom (1926).

Novello briefly went to Hollywood, but he soon returned to Britain, where he had more successes, especially on stage, appearing in his own lavish West End productions of musicals. The best known of these were Glamorous Night (1935) and The Dancing Years (1939).

From the 1930s, Novello often performed with Zena Dare, writing parts for her in his works.

Novello continued to write for film, but he had his biggest late successes with stage musicals: Perchance to Dream (1945), King’s Rhapsody (1949) and Gay’s the Word (1951).

The Ivor Novello Awards were named after him in 1955.

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivor_Novello

Photo Attribution © (Photographer Unstated), Ivor Novello, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://legacyprojectchicago.org/person/ivor-novello

Music Attribution © Marion Grimaldi and the Williams Singers, We’ll Gather Lilacs, Written by Ivor Novello

Video Attribution gercha88

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY8NrX6zY5M

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Life Box – Quote of the day

Jim Morrison (1943 -1971) was an American singer, songwriter and poet, who was the lead vocalist of the rock band the Doors.

Morrison’s wild personality, poetic lyrics, distinctive voice, unpredictable and erratic performances, and the dramatic circumstances surrounding his life and early death has contributed to his iconic standing.

Morrison is regarded by music critics and fans as one of the most iconic and influential frontmen in rock history.

Since Morrison’s death, his fame has endured as one of popular culture’s most rebellious and oft-displayed icons, representing the generation gap and youth counterculture.

Together with pianist Ray Manzarek, Morrison co-founded the Doors during the summer of 1965 in Venice, California.

The band spent two years in obscurity until shooting to prominence with their number-one single in the United States, “Light My Fire”, taken from their self-titled debut album.

Morrison recorded a total of six studio albums with the Doors, all of which sold well and received critical acclaim.

Morrison was well known for improvising spoken word poetry passages while the band played live.

Manzarek said Morrison

“embodied hippie counterculture rebellion”.

Morrison died unexpectedly in Paris at the age of 27, amid conflicting witness reports.

Since no autopsy was performed, the cause of Morrison’s death remains disputed.

Though the Doors recorded two more albums after Morrison died, his death severely affected the band’s fortunes, and they split up in 1973. In 1993,

Morrison was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Doors.

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Morrison

Photo Attribution © (Photographer Unstated / Elektra Records), Jim Morrison,1969

Source Attribution  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Morrison#/media/File:Jim_Morrison_1969.JPG

View more Life Box quotations

Music Attribution © Jim Morrison / The Doors, People are Strange, 1967

Video Attribution Jim Morrison

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sezc05A4s2g

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry – Let Love’s Music Linger – A poem by Goff James

© Ronald Hunter, Close your Eyes

Let Love’s Music Linger by Goff James

A poem dedicated and gifted to a dear blogging friend

Poem Attribution, Goff James, Let Love’s Music Linger

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

View more poetry by Goff James

Painting Attribution © Ronald Hunter, Close your Eyes, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Close-Your-Eyes/630570/7359713/view

Music Attribution © Nat King Cole, Let There be Love

Video Attribution Páraic Love

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_aJfZw3SA2c

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Music Box – Freight Train – Elizabeth Cotten

Elizabeth Cotten (1893 -1987) was an American blues and folk musician, singer, and songwriter.

A self-taught left-handed guitarist, Cotten developed her own original style.

When Elizabeth Cotten and her brothers were playing music together each would have songs that they called their own, and Freight Train was one that she made up and sang as hers.

It was one of the few she ever composed herself and was largely inspired by the train running near her home.

Cotten played a guitar strung for a right-handed player, but played it upside down, as she was left-handed. This position meant that she would play the bass lines with her fingers and the melody with her thumb.

Her signature alternating bass style has become known as “Cotten picking”.

Cotten began writing music while toying with her older brother’s banjo.

Being left-handed, so Cotten played the banjo in reverse position.

Later, when Cotten transferred her songs to the guitar, she formed a unique style, since on the banjo the uppermost string is not a bass string, but a short, high-pitched string which ends at the fifth fret.

This required her to adopt a unique style for the guitar. She first played with the “all finger down strokes” like a banjo.

Later, Cotten’s playing evolved into a unique style of fingerpicking. Her signature alternating bass style is now known as “Cotten picking”. Her fingerpicking techniques have influenced many other musicians.

For her part, Elizabeth Cotten was about as “marginal” and “humble” as could be, but her music had sophistication, bearing the nimbleness of a musical master and the mark of a lifetime of experience.

She played her first live show with Mike Seeger in 1959 and before long had launched one of the more glamorous careers among grandmothers, at the intersection of folk and blues, playing alongside stars like Taj Mahal and Muddy Waters.

Cotten also played the legendary Newport Folk Festival in 1968, as well as the Philadelphia Folk Festival, the Smithsonian Festival, and others.

Cotten later relocated to Syracuse, New York, though she was frequently on the road. Cotten recorded seven albums and toured nationally and abroad for the duration of her life.

In 1985, at 93, Cotten won a Grammy for Best Ethnic or Traditional Folk Recording for her album Elizabeth Cotten — Live!

Lyrics – Freight Train, Freight Train by Elizabeth Cotten

Freight Train, Freight Train
Run so fast
Freight Train, Freight Train
Run so fast
Please don’t tell what train I’m on
They won’t know what route I’m going

When I’m dead and in my grave
No more good times here I crave

Place the stones at my head and feet
And tell them all that I’m gone to sleep

When I die Lord bury me deep
Way down on old Chestnut Street

So I can hear old number nine
As she comes rolling by

When I die Lord bury me deep
Way down on old Chestnut Street

Place the stones at my head and feet
And tell them all that I’ve gone to sleep

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Cotten & https://timeline.com/elizabeth-cotton-folk-singer-grammy-cde749c360b9

Photo Attribution © John Chen (Smithsonian Institution), Elizabeth Cotten, 1960

Source Attribution https://timeline.com/elizabeth-cotton-folk-singer-grammy-cde749c360b9

Music Attribution © Elizabeth Cotten, Freight Train

Video Attribution JRRecordingCo

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8UN_6AUgCw

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Paintings – Poetry – Music – Quotation – Monday’s Round-up Read, View and Listen – Selected by Goff James

Painting 1 Attribution © גדעון שפיגל (Gideon Spiegel / “Goodash”), Abandoned Art Gallery-3, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/New-Media-Abandoned-Art-Gallery-3-Limited-Edition-1-of-1/697239/4067825/view

Poem 1 Attribution © Music by Rainer Maria Rilke (Translated by A. Poulin)

Haiku 1, 2 Attribution, Goff James, Spun in Threads of Gold, Winter Sunset Burns

Senryū 1, Attribution Goff James, Midnight’s Breeze Whispers

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More haiku poems by Goff James

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Painting 2 Attribution © Anna Schueler, Tangerine Dream, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/print/Painting-TANGERINE-DREAM-I-send-you-all-my-love/554227/3816918/view

Music Attribution © Jack Jackson And His Orchestra, Make Those People Sway

Video Attribution lindyhoppers

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUjebOwcFIY

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Music Box – Make Those People Sway – Jack Jackson

Jack Jackson (1906 – 1978) was an English trumpeter and bandleader popular during the British dance band era, and who later became a highly influential radio disc jockey.

© (Photographer Unstated), Jack Jackson,(Date Unstated)

Jackson was born in Barnsley, Yorkshire, the son of a brass band player and conductor, and began playing cornet at the age of 11 before playing violin and cello in dance bands.He learnt to play trumpet and worked in swing bands in circuses, revues, ballrooms and ocean liners.

In 1926 Bert Ralton brought his band to England, and Jackson joined them for a three-month tour of southern Africa.

Jackson joined Jack Hylton’s band in 1927, staying until 1930 as the orchestra’s lead trumpet and cornet.

During this time, he also “freelanced” for numerous bands and studio orchestras.

After leaving Hylton in late 1930, Jackson returned to England where, after briefly playing with Ray Noble and Roy Fox, he joined Jack Payne and the BBC Dance Orchestra in 1931, staying with him after leaving the BBC the following year.

Jackson left Payne to form his own band in 1933. By the end of year, Jack Jackson and his Orchestra started a five-year residency at the Dorchester Hotel in London.

Jackson’s signature tune was “Make Those People Sway”, and his regular closing theme tune was “Dancing in the Dark”.

By 1939, Jackson had a regular radio show on Radio Luxembourg.

After the 1939-45 war, Jackson decided not to reform his band, and turned to compering on the BBC Light Programme in such shows as “Record Roundup”, which ran from 1948 to 1977.

Jackson’s methods of presentation included punctuating records with surreal comedy clips and using quick cutting of pre-recorded tapes to humorous effect. This was a major influence on later British disc jockeys such as Kenny Everett and Noel Edmonds.

Jackson had a chat show on ITV in 1955. His presentation style was evident in the 1960 comedy and musical film Climb Up the Wall, in which he starred.

Jackson appeared as himself in Jamboree (1957). He emigrated to Tenerife in 1962, sending his taped programmes by air to the BBC each week.

Jackson was one of the disc jockeys that launched BBC Radio 1 on Saturday 30 September 1967. He broadcast at 1pm with the “Jack Jackson Show”.

Jackson then moved from Radio 1 to BBC Radio 2.

Jackson is remembered as a member of the UK Radio Academy’s Hall of Fame.

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Jackson_(radio_personality)

Photo Attribution © (Photographer Unstated), Jack Jackson,(Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://nostalgiacentral.com/television/tv-by-decade/tv-shows-1950s/jack-jackson-show-the/

Music Attribution © Jack Jackson And His Orchestra, Make Those People Sway

Video Attribution lindyhoppers

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUjebOwcFIY

More music from the Music Box

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry