Spotlight Art – A St. David’s Day Celebration of the Landscape of Wales – Paintings by Gwiym Pritchard, Ernest Zobole, Mary Lloyd Jones and David Barnes

The four images depict a variety of landscape paintings of Wales. The works are Mynydd Parys / Parys Mountain by Gwilym Pritchard, About the Inside and Landscape N0. 8 by Emile Zobole, Preseli by Mary Lloyd Jones and  Evening Tide Across the Baya  by David Barnes.painting titled by the artist. Each of the works are a vibrant atmospheric landscape painting. Layers of colour, shapes and texture and a variety of mark making provide depth, movement and give the paintings their dramatic intensity.
© Gwilym Pritchard, Mynydd Parys / Parys Mountain, (Date Unstated)
© Ernest Zobole, About the Inside and Landscape No. 8, c.1990
© Mary Lloyd Jones, Preseli,, 2017
© David Barnes, Evening Tide Across the Bay, (Date Unstated)

Painting 1 Attribution © Gwilym Pritchard, Mynydd Parys / Parys Mountain, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/mynydd-parys-181306

Painting 2 Attribution © Ernest Zobole, About the Inside and Landscape N0. 8, c.1990

Source Attribution https://en.artsdot.com/@@/AQVCNT-Ernest%20Zobole-About%20the%20Inside%20and%20Landscape%20No.8

Painting 3 Attribution © Mary Lloyd Jones, Preseli,, 2017

Source Attribution https://www.artwales.com/exhibition-mtg-en.php?locationID=308

Painting 4 Attribution © David Barnes, Evening Tide Across the Bay’, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.1stdibs.com/art/paintings/landscape-paintings/david-barnes-contemporary-welsh-landscape-evening-tide-across-bay-david-barnes/id-a_6186392/

View more works from the Spotlight Art Gallery

Thank you for your visit

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Photography – A Beginner’s Guide – Portrait Photography [Irving Penn] – An article by Goff James

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and another update in my photography Beginner’s Guide to Photography.

This week I will be continuing to look at Portrait Photography and looking at an image by Irving Penn.

As I have stated in previous articles one can learn so much about photography by looking at; and, talking about other photographers’ work.

Portrait Photography may be defined as;

  • simply creating a likeness of a person, especially of the face.
  • a good quality image that not only captures a person’s physical likeness but also something of the person’s character, generally in a manner that is attractive and pleasing to the subject.

https://www.photographytips.com/page.cfm/368

  • simply the depiction of an individual
  • recording the physical form and features of the portrait sitter including characterisation, personal context, possible relationships and often a connection with that persons life, lifestyle and work.
  • conveying a very real and intense sense of the sitters personality, their interests and personal environment.

http://www.photokonnexion.com/definition-portraiture/

  • an image depicting only the face or head and shoulders of a subject.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/portrait

  • being more than just a visual record that is used to show the power, importance, virtue, beauty, wealth, taste, learning or other qualities of the sitter. 

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/portrait

  • capturing the personality of a subject by using effective lighting, backdrops, and poses.
  • being an image of a subject that may be artistic or clinical as part of a medical study.
  • the commissioning of images for special occasions, such as weddings or school events.
  • serving many purposes, from usage on a personal web site to display in the lobby of a business.

A. Johnson

A true portrait should, today and a hundred years from today, be the testimony of how this person looked and what kind of human being he was.”

Philippe Halsman

https://www.phototraces.com/creative-photography/famous-portrait-photographers/

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Irving Penn, Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, France, 1957

The subject is framed within the image’s formal design.

The curving lines of the hat’s brim and coat collar draws the viewer’s eye in and around the frame to explore the entirety of the composition.

Lit from the left side of the frame combined with the creative use of light and shadow imbues the image with a dramatic intensity.

This arrangement isolates the subject and removes him from his own everyday reality.

The hat and dark overcoat are the only props utilised within the composition and facilitate an intense engagement not only between the subject and the photographer but also outwards to the viewer and beyond exuding a sense of stillness and serene spirituality.

The image presents a cool, even appraisal that neither assaults nor caresses the sitter.

What I really try to do is photograph people at rest, in a state of serenity,’’

Irving Penn (interview with The New York Times Magazine, 1977)

Compositionally minimalistic in form the image presents the subject face half obscured receding in shadow.

It is a sparse lustrous head-and-shoulder portrait taken close-up, cropped within the constricting space of the square frame and set against a discreet neutral blurred background.

…. As a result there is a greater emphasis on a subtle exploration of gesture and expression between photographer and sitter.” 

Magdalene Keaney (Art Historian)

 (Irving Penn Portraits. London: National Portrait Gallery, 2010, p. 7.)

The confrontational positioning of the subject close-up to the lens with its focus being directly upon the subject’s highlighted face, the shallow depth of field, precise clarity, severity and impassivity amplifies the sitter’s gesture, expression and powerful persona.

The lack of context confuses the viewer’s sense of scale and heightens awareness not just of the sitter’s face and what it reveals, but of what is unseen – the subject’s remoteness and possible vulnerability.

The image captures more than the subject’s character and individuality through the inclusion of the elaborate embroidery on the collar of the overcoat.

The tight cropping of Picasso’s face and deep highlight and shadow across it both flattens and breaks the image, into a series of abstract shapes and planes that reflect the cubist mantra of fragmentation.

As Mark Haworth-Booth states in his introduction to Irving Penn Fringes, (PaceWildensteinMacGill exhibition catalogue, 1996, n.p.) :

[it] is literally reflected in Picasso’s left eye.

“It represents not only the world beyond the viewfinder and studio, but also the tool of the current artist at work—the natural, ideally northern, daylight in which Penn preferred to work.

There is a great deal of detail within the print including the photographer’s daylight studio in the reflection of Picasso’s left eye.

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Irving Penn, Detail image Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes , 1957

The image, at one level without a title, presents the rejection of any contextual narrative that readily identifies the sitter.

However the image’s title suggests otherwise through identifying the sitter.

This information arguably changes the context.

Through eschewing any defined background the subject assumes the central role, prompting viewers to focus on the very essence of the sitter,

“[Penn’s photographs] are not stories, but simply pictures.”

John Szarkowski

Director of photography at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, 

The close-up portrait is skilfully and almost perfectly centered around the sitter’s left eye with its penetrating look – a homage to Cubism.

The frame, divided into sections, bares the geometric abstraction of the artist’s Cubist period.

Other references to the style are rendered within the image, the embroidery on the overcoat, the eye, the strong tonal contrasts, the collar of the overcoat slicing, the face at an unconventional angle, the assembly of bold shapes the abstraction of the ear and the different lines dissecting the plane

The portrait may be compared with Picasso’s grey-toned  Buste de femme “, 26 III, 1956

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Pablo Picasso, Buste de femme “, 26 III 1956

and “Portrait de femme à la robe verte”, 1956

d03aa70b9f61247691f3c4a0ba85f53a--picasso-art-pablo-picasso
Pablo Picasso, Portrait de femme à la robe verte”, May 1, 1956

In many ways Penn’s portrait of Picasso becomes more of a probable self-visualisation by Picasso rather than a regimented projection by the photographer of how a portrait should be.

The image of Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, possesses a duality of meaning that embraces two great masters, both subtly revealing themselves from different sides of the same lens.

I trust that you find some of these ideas useful within the context of your own photography.

Don’t be afraid to experiment and allow different ideas to develop as you go along.

Remember the things which I have referred to in previous articles about taking photos and creating photograms; the same applies to considering your own photos, other photographers’ work as well as applying different artist’s ideas too.

Don’t be afraid to experiment.

Experiment! Experiment! Experiment!

Remember there are no right or wrong answers or ways of doing it.

Your photographs are your world.

You can do what you like. 

Don’t worry about the theory and trying to remember everything about how to take or consider how to look at or stage a photograph.

Don’t worry about what you might think is right or wrong in talking about or taking photographs.

 Make mistakes. Laugh. Have funJust enjoy the process.

Happy Photography. 

Thank you for your visit.

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Reference List

http://www.archive.boston.com/bostonglobe/obituaries/articles/2009/10/08/irving_penn_92_his_sparse_lustrous_portraits_revealed/

http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/exhibitions/IrvingPennArchives/portraitshttp://www.dptips-central.com/irving-penn.html

https://www.artofplatinum.wordpress.com/category/irving-penn-2/

http://www.npg.org.uk/about/press/irving-penn-portraits1.php

https://www.phillips.com/detail/IRVING-PENN/NY040210/22

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/recycled/2009/10/irving_penn_rip.html

http://www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/close-encounters

https://theredlist.com/wiki-2-16-601-793-view-fashion-1-profile-penn-irving.html

https://www.widewalls.ch/photography-portraits/richard-avedon-marilyn-monroe/

 

Photography – Photograms – A Beginner’s Guide – A Blurring of Boundaries 2 – Paul Klee’s Influence – An article by Goff James

Welcome followers and visitors to another update in A Beginner’s Guide to Photography. Today I will be discussing some more ideas with regard to experimenting further with photograms as well as continuing discussing more ideas related to one of my personal favourite artists – Paul Klee.

20171027_092108abFear FBO
Goff James, Fear is a habit, Photogram, 2017

In past articles I have often stated, especially for a beginner, it is good to look at ones own photographs as well as those of other photographers and artists; by doing so, one is able to learn to understand better what photography is all about.

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Goff James, White Line, Photogram, 2017

Here I have taken the photogram and reconstructed elements onto the surface and then rephotographed the image and then experimented further with them in an editing suite.

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Goff James, Box with Two Red Arrows, Photogram, 2017

Paul Klee has had a significant influence on my developing art practice. His ideas subconsciously influence other areas of my own practice including working with the process of creating photograms.

Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 17.46.43
Paul Klee, Affected Place [Betroffener Ort], 1922,
Ink, pencil, and watercolor on paper; top and bottom strips with watercolor and ink, mounted on cardboard,
Zentrum Paul Klee, Berne

Created in Klee’s early Bauhaus years, this piece shows a scene of ambiguous signs and symbols over a background of modulated purples and oranges.

The various strips of colour hint at a horizon, their horizontal emphasis counteracted only by the boldly painted arrow, which abruptly suggests something as ordinary as a road sign.

Like the many gradations of colour, the arrow generates movement, compelling the viewer’s eye to the centre of the picture.

The influence on Klee of Cubist still lives art by such as those of Picasso and Braque, is clearly apparent: Klee suggests a motif painted from nature while also cancelling it, as though to remind us that this is no window but a kind of abstract sign system.

Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 17.50.47
Paul Klee, Two Ways,1932
Watercolor on paper, mounted on paper
sheet:313 x 484 mm; mount: 443 x 610 mm)
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Estate of Karl Nierendorf
Screen Shot 2017-10-29 at 16.26.08
Paul Klee, Scherzo with Thirteen (Das Scherzo mit der Dreizehn),1922
Oil transfer drawing, watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper on board,
279 x 359 mm, © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS),
New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Whilst Klee was at the Bauhaus, he explored distinctive ways of image–making, including transfer drawings. This work was created by tracing the lines of a pencil drawing through a black-inked surface onto another clean sheet of paper.

The clean sheet received the outline of the drawing in black as well as additional smudges of excess pigment, to which Klee then directly added motifs in watercolour and ink.

It is the the arching and angled arrows, before which whimsical figures appear to dance, indicate motion and spatial depth that I find extremely interesting.

The reference to music, a mainstay in Klee’s life and in his Bauhaus activities, is accentuated by his use of the word “scherzo,” referring to a vigorous and playful composition, in the work’s title.

I like this idea of introducing letters and words into a composition. This is something that one might like to experiment with within ones own photography. There is so much to be learned from ‘playing’ with such ideas.

20171027_101137abcde FBO
Goff James, Circle and Three White Shapes, Photogram, 2017

This is something that I have experimented with in my own photographs and photograms. I continue to develop such ideas with regard to symbolism and pictorial narrative. The following images are the results of my own past endeavours.

Gallery

Reference Attribution List

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-klee-paul.htm

https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/paul-klee

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79456

Photogram Attributions, Goff James

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More photography by Goff James

I trust that you find some of these ideas useful within the context of your own photography. Don’t be afraid to experiment and allow different ideas to develop as you go along.

Remember what I referred to in previous articles about taking photos and creating photograms; the same applies to considering your own photos, other photographers’ work as well as applying different artist’s ideas too.

Don’t be afraid to experiment.

Experiment! Experiment! Experiment!

Remember there are no right or wrong answers or ways of doing it.

Your photographs are your world.

You can do what you like. 

Don’t worry about the theory and trying to remember everything about how to take or consider how to look at or stage a photograph.

Don’t worry about what you might think is right or wrong in talking about or taking photographs.

 Make mistakes. Laugh. Have funJust enjoy the process.

Happy Photography. 

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog.

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

What the hell makes me think I am an artist? – Art, artists and paintings, an article by Goff James

“All art is a kind of confession, more or less oblique. All artists, if they are to survive, are forced, at last, to tell the whole story; to vomit the anguish up.”

James Baldwin

Working Title: African Art / Published Title: Women of African A

Image Credit

© Aïda Muluneh, Lest We Remember, 2017

Image Source

https://www.departures.com/art-culture/women-african-artists

 

“…being different, going against the grain of society is the greatest thing in the world.”

Elijah Wood

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-04 at 11.25.50

 

Image Credit

© Tilau Nangala, (Title and Date Unstated)

Image Source

https://tjupiarts.com.au/artists/

 

“Art is something that makes you breathe with a different kind of happiness.”

Anni Albers

anni_albers_wall_hanging_1926_1

Image Credit

© Anni Albers, Black White Yellow 1926, re-woven 1965 

Image Source

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/anni-albers
Conceptualizing, visualizing, interpreting and creating through image making is primevally basic for art and the artistic process. Such images were created in the period before the invention of formal writing, and when human populations were migrating and expanding across the globe.

2013_2034.4260

Image Credit

© TARA/David Coulson, Handprints and other figures, Awanghet, Tassili n’Ajjer, Algeria  

Image Source

https://africanrockart.britishmuseum.org/introduction/chronologies/

The first human artistic representations, markings with ground red ochre, seem to have occurred about 100,000 B.C. in African Rock Art. This chronology may be more an artefact of the limitations of archaeological evidence than a true picture of when humans first used form to create art.

“If you ask me what I came to do in this world, I, an artist, will answer you: I am here to live out loud.”

Emile Zola

Screen Shot 2018-11-04 at 10.30.48

Image Credit

© Yayoi Kusama, I Want to Sing My Heart Out in Praise of Life, 2009

Image Source

https://www.artsy.net/artwork/yayoi-kusama-i-want-to-sing-my-heart-out-in-praise-of-life-2

“I wanted to start a revolution, using art to build the sort of society I myself envisioned.”

Yayoi Kusama

Screen Shot 2018-11-04 at 11.58.05

Image Credit

© Coatlicue, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City, c.1250-1521 CE

Image Source

https://www.ancient.eu/image/2164/coatlicue/

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.”

Anais Nin

Look, look and look again… – Art, Artists and Paintings an article by Goff James

“You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again. You can also look at the picture for a second and think of it all your life.”

Joan Miro

Screen Shot 2018-10-28 at 09.53.58

Image Credit

© Joan Miró, Women and Bird in the Moonlight, 1949

Image Source

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/miro-women-and-bird-in-the-moonlight-n06007

“Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art.”

Leonardo da Vinci

Automobile Leonardo da Vinci

Image Credit

© Leonardo da Vinci, The Automobile, Sketch -1478

Image Source

http://www.leonardo-da-vinci.net/automobile/

“I wanted to start a revolution, using art to build the sort of society I myself envisioned.”

Yayoi Kusama

yayoi kusama studio infinity mirrored room - filled with the brilliance of life 2011

Image Credit

© Yayoi Kusama, Studio Infinity Mirrored Room – Filled with the Brilliance of Life, 2011

Image Source

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/yayoi-kusama

Through analysis, comparison, symbolism and emphasizing of the visual elemental composition of form, art enables man to possess the essential mechanisms of perceiving, comprehending, understanding and interpreting. The relevant extracted data is then set out in terms of measured quantities and the found order is expressed in the individual’s analysis of the differing relationships of the inherent structures of that particular artistic form. Whether through communicating using semantic, syntactic or pragmatic processes.

“Humans see what they want to see.”

Rick Riordan

d7hftxdivxxvm.cloudfront

Image Credit

© Remedios VaroPapilla Estelar, 1958

Image Source

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-8-female-surrealists-who-are-not-frida-kahlo

“All that can fall within the compass of human understanding, being either, first, the nature of things, as they are in themselves, their relations, and their manner of operation: or, secondly, that which man himself ought to do, as a rational and voluntary agent, for the attainment of any end, especially happiness: or, thirdly, the ways and means whereby the knowledge of both the one and the other of these is attained and communicated;…”

John Locke

Screen Shot 2018-10-28 at 10.32.27

Image Credit

©
Julie Mehretu, Untitled 2, 1999

Image Source

http://www.artnet.com/artists/julie-mehretu/untitled-2-EHXfwFxlbarZXN5h82YCDw2

“All art is a kind of confession, more or less oblique. All artists, if they are to survive, are forced, at last, to tell the whole story; to vomit the anguish up.”

James Baldwin

Screen Shot 2018-10-28 at 10.43.02

Image Credit

© Jackson Pollock, Birth, c.1941

Image Source

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/pollock-birth-t03979

“Painting is self-discovery. Every good artist paints what [they] is.”

Jackson Pollock

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful and peaceful day.

You are welcome to visit and join me by pressing the link below.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art, Non-art or kitsch it’s a question of imagining possibilities. – Writing about Art, artists and paintings by Goff James

Winter Bears 1988 by Jeff Koons born 1955

Image Credit

© Jeff Koons, Winter Bears, 1988 

Image Source

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/k/kitsch

“Everything you can imagine is real.” 

 Pablo Picasso

Screen Shot 2018-10-21 at 13.05.45

Image Credit

©  Pablo Picasso, Faun Revealing a Sleeping Woman (Jupiter and Antiope, after Rembrandt), 1936

Source Credit

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/picasso-faun-revealing-a-sleeping-woman-jupiter-and-antiope-after-rembrandt-p11360

“Art will remain the most astonishing activity of mankind born out of struggle between wisdom and madness, between dream and reality in our mind.”

Magdalena Abakanowicz

Embryology 1978-80 by Magdalena Abakanowicz born 1930

Image Credit

© Magdalena Abakanowicz, Embryology 1978–80

Source Credit

https://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/display/materials-and-objects/magdalena-abakanowicz

The imagination is a powerful tool. An artist can use it to show others the world as [they see] it and to bring others into [their] dream of what the world could be.”

David R. Becker

Black-Daisy-1

Image Credit

© David Becker, Black Daisy, 2013

Source Credit

http://davidbeckerart.com/

It is through the human brain’s capacity and ability to handle intricate processes of sorting, sifting and organizing visual stimuli that humankind is enabled to achieve insight into the ordered inter-relationships of our environment and consequently the manner in which we respond to the visual impulses received from without. It is this three fold process and inter-linking between the elements; interaction, interpretation and response that enables humans to attempt to discern and to make a statement about, the processes of the nature of things and their intense variations in all their passive and dynamic moods.

“Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine and at last you create what you will”

George Bernard Shaw

[The Perfect Wagnerite, words of the Serpent to Eve, 5:348])

“Go where the silence is and say something.”

Amy Goodman

Screen Shot 2018-10-21 at 13.28.58

 

Image Credit

© Amy Goodman‘George Best’, Wearing The 1968 European Cup Final Shirt

Image Source

https://www.amygoodman.co.uk/Welded-Steel.html

“Imagination is the real and eternal world of which this vegetable universe is but a faint shadow.”

William Blake

Screen Shot 2018-10-21 at 13.36.44

Image Credit

© William Blake, The Ghost of a Flea, c.1819–20

Source Credit

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/william-blake-39

IMGP5914a

Image Credit

© Kiettisak Channonnart, Haunted Subconscious Mind 1, 1981

Image Source

Museum Of Contemporary Art, Bangkok

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Are artists prisoners of their actions and beliefs? – Art, an article by Goff James

Untitled-1ab WOW

Goff James, Untitled, 2018

“An artist should never be a prisoner of himself, prisoner of style, prisoner of reputation, prisoner of success.”

Henri Matisse

The Snail 1953 by Henri Matisse 1869-1954

 

Image Credit

© Henri Matisse, The Snail 1953 ,Succession Henri Matisse/DACS 2018 

Image Source

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/henri-matisse-1593

“Art is standing with one hand extended into the universe and one hand extended into the world, and letting ourselves be a conduit for passing energy.”

Albert Einstein

Working Title: African Art / Published Title: Women of African A

Image Credit

© Peju Alatise, Flying Girls, 2016,

Image Source

https://www.departures.com/art-culture/women-african-artists

“My [paintings] have neither object nor space nor line nor anything – no forms. They are light, lightness, about merging, about formlessness, breaking down form.”

Agnes Martin 

Humankind’s actions can be motivated by religion, politics or merely by the inner desire to create and serves mirror-like as a reflection of a particular moment in time. Whatever the particular individual circumstances are image making requires a personal, intellectual or emotional discourse between the instigator and his environment. Artists utilize particular techniques and methods, sometimes perfecting them or even inventing completely new ones, however without spiritual individuality, image making could not achieve anything other than just being non-art.

“Between the art and the artist there is no distance.”

Attributed to Rowan Gillespie

great-work-by-the-renown

Image Credit

© Rowan Gillespie, Blackrock Dolmen Sculpture, 1988

Image Source

https://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g10536946-d14173696-i323544215-The_Blackrock_Dolmen_Sculpture-Blackrock_County_Dublin.html

kahlo-three_2576062c

Image Credit

© Amrita Sher-GilThree Girls, 1935

Source Credit

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/10087130/The-Indian-Frida-Kahlo.html

“Creativity gives hope that there can be a worthwhile idea.”

Edward de Bono

“I always wanted to have the courage to do totally crazy, impossible, and also wrong things.”

Isa Genzken

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The power of imagination and creativity as processes within the human spirit and cultures… – Art, Artists and Paintings a review by Goff James

UntitledWOW

Goff James, Untitled, 2010, Copyright © Artist
All rights reserved

“Every human has four endowments – self awareness, conscience, independent will and creative imagination. These give us the ultimate human freedom… The power to choose, to respond, to change.”

Stephen Covey

DSCF5809

Tawee Rajaneekorn, Prostitutes Under The Tree, 2005, ©Tawee Rajaneekorn, Location MOCA, Bangkok

Tawee Rajaneekorn

“The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.”

Albert Einstein

DSCF5815

Tawee Rajaneekorn, Belief and Faith, 2007, ©Tawee Rajaneekorn, Location MOCA, Bangkok

Art, form and creativity refer to the visible elements of a piece, independent of their meaning. When one looks at a particular image the formal elements contained within it are made up of colour, dimension, lines, mass, shape, etc., while the feelings of mystery and intrigue the piece evokes are informal products of the onlooker’s imagination.

DSCF5829

Tinnakorn Kasornsuwan, House Warming Party, 2011 ©Tinnakorn Kasornsuwan, Location MOCA, Bangkok

Tinnakorn Kasornsuwan

“The imagination is a powerful tool. An artist can use it to show others the world as he sees it and to bring others into his dream of what the world could be.”

David R. Becker

DSCF5853a

Kiettisak Chanonnart, Haunted Subconscious Mind 1, 1981, ©Kiettisak Chanonnart, Location, MOCA, Bangkok

Kiettisak Chanonnart

“Creativity is putting your imagination to work, and it’s produced the most extraordinary results in human culture.”

Ken Robinson

DSCF5813a.jpg

Sriwan Janehuttakarnkit, Dancing, 2011,  ©Sriwan Janehuttakarnkit, Location, MOCA, Bangkok

Sriwan Janehuttakarnkit

“Imagination does not become great until human beings, given the courage and the strength, use it to create.” 

Maria Montessori

IMGP5972a

Tawee Rajaneekorn, Screaming Forest, 2014, ©Tawee Rajaneekorn, Location MOCA, Bangkok

MOCA, Bangkok

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Time, Motivation, Passion, Action – The process of instigation…

Welcome to Conversation Corner

TraceFBOWOW

Goff James, Trace, 2015

“All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.”

Aristotle

193562-004-245629FD

krater
Arrival or departure of a young warrior or hero, detail of an Apulian krater, c. 410–400 BCE.

krater

“It seems that if you put people on paper and move them through time, you cannot help but talk about ethics, because the ethical realm exists nowhere if not here: in the consequences of human actions as they unfold in time, and the multiple interpretive possibility of those actions.”

Zadie Smith

Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991 by Cornelia Parker born 1956

Cornelia Parker
Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991 
Tate
© Cornelia Parker

Cornelia Parker

Human actions can be motivated by religion, politics or merely by the inner passion to create and serves mirror-like as a reflection of a particular moment in time. Whatever the particular individual circumstances are; image making requires a personal, intellectual or emotional discourse between the instigator and their environment. Artists utilize particular techniques and methods, sometimes perfecting them or even inventing completely new ones, however without spiritual individuality, image making could not achieve anything other than just being kitsch.

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Rowan Gillespie “Freedom” Bronze,

Rowan Gillespie

“Between the art and the artist there is no distance.”

Attributed to Rowan Gillespie

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Vasan Sitthiket V40, Installation, 2016

Vasan Sitthiket V40, Installation, 2016

“Art is the desire of [humans] to express [themselves], to record the reactions of [their personalities} to the world [they live] in.”

Amy Lowell

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

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https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Creativity, visual style, representation and symbolism – The process of perception and interpretation…

Welcome to Conversation Corner

Untitled-6

Goff James, Untitled, 2018

“Create your own visual style… let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others.” 

Orson Welles

Image property of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY.

Jackson Pollock, Convergence, 1952 © https://www.jackson-pollock.org/convergence.jsp

Jackson Pollock

“Be drawn to the visual arts for it can expand your imagination.”

Barbara Januszkiewicz

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Andrew Rogers, A Day On Earth, 2009 © https://www.andrewrogers.org/land-art/turkey/a-day-on-earth/

Andrew Rogers

Humans appear neither content nor satisfied with visual representation being a mere symbol. The human intellectual process which involves perception and interpretation of an image and requires more than a constructed isolated diagram of his interpretation of the mind’s image. Individuals, significantly at some point and somewhere early in the mists of prehistory discovered; whether by chance, by accident or deliberate intent to develop a means of marking witness to their existence and apparent values.

Stonehenge

“All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.”

Edgar Allan Poe

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Indonesian Cave Art,  Photograph: Kinez Riza/University of Wollongong/PA, https://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/oct/11/cave-paintings-indonesia-african-roots

“What art is, in reality, is this missing link, not the links which exist. It’s not what you see that is art; art is the gap.”

Marcel Duchamp

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

You are welcome to visit and join me by pressing the link below.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com