Cyfarthfa Castle

Cyfarthfa CastleFBO

Goff James, Cyfarthfa Castle, 2018

Welcome to my poetry.

Notes

Cyfarthfa Castle

 

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All images and poems used here are the copyright of:

© goffjamesart/photography/poetry

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Talking Pictures (26) – Genre: Conceptual Art and the Power of Text [Sophie Calle, (1953 – to date, French)]

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and the latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of  the Conceptual Art genre in photography that will hopefully continue to inform and support a personal project entitled The Object as Cipher – Interpretation, meaning and the Development of Narrative. Today’s topic is a discussion about work by Sophie Calle.

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Sophie Calle, Chambre avec vue / Room with a view, Date Unstated

The appeal of SC’s images is the manner in which she combines photos, texts  and conceptual installations to weave a narrative of private experiences, her own and that of others.

SC’s work amounts to a systematic laying bare of reality, whether it be her own or other people’s, with a limited portion left to chance. Absence of others is a central theme in her work. The documentary manner in which she presents her work suggests a high degree of factualness.

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Sophie Calle,  “The Last Image Blind with revolver” 2010, Location Unstated

The images are a collection of varied lists of information about people who are absent and focuses on questions of absence and desire in others and her own personal relationships.

“A lot of my work is about absence, I realise. About things being taken away, …” 

Sophie Calle

That which is extremely interesting is the way in which SC offers her own emotional and psychological life as a subject of art inviting viewers to meditate on that which is presented within the image.

Her works are distinguished by the directness of her formal approach, her narrative skill, the conceptual enrichment they undergo over the course of their creation, and their power to draw in the observer with their varied abilities and experiences. The uncertainty expressed in her works is what makes them so compelling.

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Sophie Calle, “BOB” 2017
Digital photograph, diasec, light box
31 1/2 x 23 5/8 in \ 80 x 60 cm
Edition of 2, location Unstated

SC’s work frequently depicts human vulnerability, and examines identity and intimacy. That includes panels of text of her own writing. This concept appeals considerable to me as I try to find a way of presenting my own poetry, photography and art practice. I find that the three interests are gradually coalescing into a format that I wish to explore further. This is what I am hoping to achieve, at least in part, through the project.

“[SC] uses photography in unique ways – no one else works with photography / text in this outstanding original way …”

Hasselblad Foundation (2011)

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Sophie Calle
L’Hôtel, Chambre 47 (The Hotel, Room 47)
Venice, 1981
2 works on paper, photographs and ink
2140 x 1420 mm
Room 47 (22 February) is the first in the English edition. 
Tate

The image, part of a project titled The Hotel, is a two-part framed work comprising photographs and text. In the upper part, the title Room 47 is printed below a colour photograph of elegantly carved wooden twin head-boards behind a bed covered in rich brown satin.

Below it, three columns of italic text are diary entries describing SC’s findings, as a temporary chambermaid, in the hotel room between Sunday 22 February 1981 and Tuesday 24.

In the lower frame a grid of nine black and white photographs show things listed in the text above.

“The works examined the personal belongings of the hotel guests and observed through details lives which remained unknown to me. On Friday, March 6, the job came to an end.

(Quoted in Calle, pp.140-1.) 

SC’s descriptions of the hotel rooms and their contents combine factual documentation along with her personal response to the people whose lives she glimpsed by examining their belongings.

Each text begins with the chambermaid/artist’s first entry into the room and a notation of which bed or beds have been slept in, with a description of the nightwear the guests have left. A list of objects usually follows, as the artist transcribes her activities in the room.

CS’s body of work is both latently aggressive in surveillance and unashamedly voyeuristic -reading diaries, letters, postcards and notes written or kept by the unknown guests, rummaging in suitcases, looking into wardrobes and drawers, listening at and peering through doors, recording the occupants’ conversations or any other sounds she may overhear and peering into a rooms when any opportunity arose to catch a glimpse of the unknown guests. 

“These are not souvenir snapshots of a presence, but rather shots of an absence, the absence of the followed, that of the follower, and that of their reciprocal absence.”

Jean Baudrillard 

(Suite Vénitienne. Please Follow Me, trans. Dany Barash and Danny Hatfield (Seattle: Bay Press, 1998), p. 84.)

SC’ photographs contrast the intimacy of a photographs with the intrinsic banal nature of textual descriptions written with detachment. It is the combination of portraiture, objects, conceptual art and the relationship with the viewer that attracts my interest.

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Sophie Calle, L’Hôtel, Chambre 29
Room 29 (28 February) is the second in the English edition.
2 works on paper, photographs and ink
2140 x 1420 mm
Tate

I particularly like both the manner in which the images and texts are combined to create a diptych and the telling of the particular narrative and how the works are finally presented in installation format for the viewer. This format has influenced considerably the manner the direction of my personal thoughts and ideas with regard to the development of this particular project.

Reference List

http://www.arndtfineart.com/website/artist_937?idx=c

https://www.artsy.net/artist/sophie-calle

https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/sophie-calle

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/sophie-calle-2692

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/photography/10475158/Artist-Sophie-Calle-bonkers-in-a-good-way.html

https://www.widewalls.ch/sophie-calle-artist-of-the-week-october/

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You are welcome to visit and join me by pressing the link below.

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

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All images used here are the copyright of:

© Sophie Calle

 

 

Talking Pictures (21) – Genre: Still Life Painting [Dutch School, 17th. Century]

Welcome once more followers and visitors to my blog and the latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the still life genre in painting that will hopefully continue to inform and support a personal project entitled The Object as Cipher – Interpretation, meaning and the Development of Narrative. Today’s topic is Still Life and in particular the Dutch School of the 17th. century.

The emergence of the Dutch school of painting in the early seventeenth century is one of the most extraordinary phenomena in the history of the visual arts and especially in their rendition of the Still Life genre.

Still-life painting as an independent genre first flourished in the Netherlands during the early 1600s.

Still-life motifs occur fairly frequently in manuscripts, books of hours, and panel paintings of the 1400s and 1500s, –

Robert Campin’s Annunciation Triptych c.1427 -32,
Oil on oak
Overall: 645 x 1178 mm
Central panel: 641 x 632 mm
Wing: 645 x 273 mm
Met Museum, NY

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Robert Campin, Annunciation Triptych, c.1427 -32

and in

Petrus Christus‘, Goldsmith in his Shop,1449-1449
Oil on oak panel
Overall:1001 x 8.8 mm
painted surface 980 x 852 mm
Met Museum, NY

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Petrus Christus, Goldsmith in his Shop,1449-1449

Many of the objects depicted in these early works are symbolic of some quality of the Virgin or another religious figure (the lily stands for purity), while other objects may remind the viewer of an edifying concept such as worldly vanity or temperance (as in the case of the goldsmith’s mirror and scales).

Moralizing meanings are also common in independent still-life paintings of the seventeenth century –

Jacques de Gheyn II’s, Vanitas Still Life of 1603,
Oil on wood
826 x 540 mm
Met Museum, NY

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Jacques de Gheyn II, Vanitas Still Life of 1603

 

Pieter Claesz’s Still Life with a Skull and a Writing Quill,1628
Oil on wood
241 x 359 mm
Met Museum, NY

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Pieter Claesz, Still Life with a Skull and a Writing Quill, 1628

and the luxuriousness of

Abraham van Beyeren’s Still Life with Lobster and Fruit, c.1650s
Oil on wood
965 x 787 mm
Met Museum, NY

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Abraham van Beyeren, Still Life with Lobster and Fruit, c.1650s

The pocket watch, symbolizes the fleeting nature of earthly pleasures and may be considered more of an intellectual conceit than a sober warning against the desire for material things like the objects depicted or the painting itself.

In general, the rise of still-life painting in the Netherlands reflected the increasing urbanization of Dutch and Flemish society, which brought with it an emphasis on the home, personal possessions, commerce, trade and learning—all the aspects and diversions of everyday life.

Vanitas and floral still lifes were prominent in the early 1600s, and in their highly refined execution and in their subjects and symbolism but for this project are not relevant to my research other than as a fleeting reference to the processes of death and decay.

My interest, for the present, lies within the so-called monochrome “banquet” or “breakfast” still life and the arrangement of the familiar common place objects.

In the 1650s and 1660s still life painters such as

Abraham van Beyeren (Beijeren), Banquet Still Life, c. 1653-55
Oil on canvas
1070 x 1155 mm
Seattle Art Museum, Seattle

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Van Beyeren, Banquet Still Life, c. 1653-55

and

Willem Kalf, Still Life with a Silver Jug and a Porcelain Bowl, 1655 – 1660
oil on canvas
738 × w 652 mm
Rijks Museum, Amsterdam

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Willem Kalf, Still Life with a Silver Jug and a Porcelain Bowl, 1655 – 1660

produced fancy display still lifes featuring imported fruits and expensive objects such as Chinese porcelain, Venetian glassware, and silver-gilt cups and trays, usually rendered in glistening light and a velvety atmosphere.

References

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection
https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/willem-kalf
https://www.nga.gov/research/online-editions/17th-century-dutch-paintings.html/
https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-199

 

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Have a wonderful day.

 

 

Reflection

 

Reflection FBO

Goff James,  Reflection, 2017, (Painting, The Three Kingdoms – Heaven, Earth and Hell © Artist Preecha Pun-Klum, MOCA, Bangkok)

Welcome To My Blog.

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Thank you for sharing your time with me.

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The painting, The Three Kingdoms – Heaven, Earth and Hell 

© Artist Preecha Pun-Klum, MOCA, Bangkok

 

The poem used here is the copyright of:

 goffjamesart/photography/poetry

Photograms Workshop 2, Klee’s Influence

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Goff James, White Crescent, Photogram, 2017

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and another update in my photography diary. This week I have again been experimenting with photograms as well as introducing ideas from one of my favourite artists – Paul Klee.

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Goff James, White Crescent and Line, Photogram, 2017

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Goff James, WCrescent with Arrow, Photogram, 2017

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Goff James, 5 2 6, Photogram, 2017

 

I have taken some of Klee’s concepts and attempted to introduce them into photograms. I have taken the photogram and reconstructed elements onto the surface and then rephotographed the image and then experimented with them in an editing suite.

Art does not reproduce what we see; rather, it makes us see.

Paul Klee

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Paul Klee, Historical Site, 1927, Watercolour and ink on paper on board, 355 x 487 mm, Tate.

That which appeals with regard to PK’s work is that it is very difficult to partition him within particular single artistic movement. His works are at times both fantastical, childlike as well as being humorous.

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Paul Klee, Insula Dulcamara 1938  Oil on newsprint, mounted on burlap, 31 1/2 x 69 in; Klee Foundation, Bern

PK was fundamentally a transcendentalist. He considered that the world was composed of many differing realities and that the physical world was only one of them. I find such an idea very interesting in deed. The artist’s use of design, pattern, colour and miniature signs and symbols within his pictorial narratives all speak of a hidden depth and meaning which I find totally absorbing and have become part of my own practices. However PK compositional construction always appears to take precedence over narrative.

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Paul Klee, Tale à la Hoffmann, 1921, Watercolor, pencil, and transferred printing ink on paper, bordered with metallic foil, 311 x 241 mm, Location Unstated

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Paul Klee, Burdened Children,1930 Graphite, crayon and ink on paper on board, 650 x 458 mm, Tate

PK was fundamentally a transcendentalist. He considered that the world was composed of many differing realities and that the physical world was only one of them. I find such an idea very interesting in deed. The artist’s use of design, pattern, colour and miniature signs and symbols within his pictorial narratives all speak of a hidden depth and meaning which I find totally absorbing and have become part of my own practices. However PK compositional construction always appears to take precedence over narrative.

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Paul Klee, Walpurgis Night 1935, Gouache on fabric on plywood
Support: 508 x 470 mm, frame: 725 x 682 x 72 mm, Tate

Another aspect of PK’s work that appeals is the great sense of rhythm and transience that are present within his works as well as his powerful expressive use of intense colour. There is an affinity between between art and music and PK utilises this analogy throughout his portfolio.

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Paul Klee, Abstract Trio, 1923
Watercolour and transferred printing ink on paper, bordered with gouache and ink, 321 x 502 mm,
The Berggruen Klee Collection, 1984 (1984.315.36) MoMA NewYork

I admire the manner in which PK challenged the traditional boundaries that segregated writing and the visual arts through “exploring a new expressive, and largely abstract or poetic language of pictorial symbols and signs. Arrows, letters, musical notation, ancient hieroglyphs, or a few black lines standing in for a person or object frequently appear in his work, while rarely demanding a specific reading.”

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Paul Klee, Static–Dynamic Gradation, 1923
Oil and gouache on paper, bordered with gouache, watercolor, and ink, 381 x 261 mm,
The Berggruen Klee Collection, 1987 (1987.455.12), MoMA, NY.

PK’s work appeals in that it appears to be very childlike with a great sense of spontaneity, freedom and simplicity.

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Paul Klee, Ghost Chamber with the Tall Door (New Version), 1925
Sprayed and brushed watercolor, and transferred printing ink on paper, bordered with gouache and ink;,487 x 294 mm
MoMA, NY

I admire the manner in which PK’s work practice was fundamentally experimental in terms of technique, expressive use of colour and challenging accepted academic perceptions with regard to art and keeping his work within the realm of the “ordinary”.

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Paul Klee, Comedians’ Handbill, 1938, Gouache on newsprint,
48.6 x 32.1 cm, Location Unstated

Everything vanishes around me, and works are born as if out of the void. Ripe, graphic fruits fall off. My hand has become the obedient instrument of a remote will.

Paul Klee

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Goff James, Red Circle with Four Red Lines, 2017

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Goff James, 9, 2017

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Goff James, Box and Red Circle, 2017

Reference List

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-klee-paul.htm

https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/paul-klee

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79456

https://www.lrb.co.uk/v36/n01/tj-clark/at-tate-modern

All photogram images used here are the copyright of:

© goffjamesart/photography/poetry

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a great day.