Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Keith Haring (1958 -1990) American graphic artist and designer who popularized some of the strategies and impulses of graffiti art.

Haring, with fellow artists Kenny Scharf and Jean-Michel Basquiat, immersed himself in the punk clubs and street art scene of New York.

In 1981 he began drawing graffiti—unauthorized chalk drawings on blank black advertising panels—in the New York subways. These would eventually number in the thousands, and they quickly created a popular following for his lively figural and patterned imagery and his cheekily outlaw activity.

Haring shared few of the “tagging” tactics of urban graffitists, being drawn instead to the possibilities of a new public and vernacular kind of signage.

Haring began making large outdoor murals, eventually executing them in Rio de Janeiro, Berlin, Melbourne, Chicago, Atlanta, and elsewhere, often assisted by scores of children.

Haring’s ebullient personality, infectious sense of play, and universally understood hieroglyphic style brought him attention from the mainstream press and transferred easily into his work in music videos and fashion design.

In 1986 Haring opened a store called the Pop Shop in New York City, where he marketed products that ranged from T-shirts and pin-on buttons to original prints. He opened a Tokyo branch of the shop in 1988.

Haring’s imagery has “become a widely recognized visual language”. His later work often addressed political and societal themes—especially homosexuality and AIDS—through his own iconography.

Haring was socially conscious, and his murals often reflected his position on social issues. He sought to raise awareness of AIDS and fought against the proliferation of illegal drugs. He died of complications of AIDS at age 31.

In 2014 Haring was one of the inaugural honourees in the Rainbow Honor Walk, a walk of fame in San Francisco’s Castro neighbourhood noting LGBTQ people who have “made significant contributions in their fields.”

In June 2019, Haring was one of the inaugural fifty American “pioneers, trailblazers, and heroes” inducted on the National LGBTQ Wall of Honour within the Stonewall National Monument (SNM) in New York City’s Stonewall Inn.

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Keith-Haring & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Haring

Photo Attribution © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Keith Haring, (Cropped, Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.thebroad.org/art/keith-haring

Documentary Attribution ©M2M, Discover the King of Street Art: Keith Haring

Video Attribution M2M – Made To Measure

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Q7K3DWILM

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Anselm Kiefer (1945) a German painter, sculptor, photographer, and installation artist; who, became one of the most prominent figures in the Neo-Expressionist art movement of the late 20th century.

Keifer’s works incorporate materials such as straw, ash, clay, lead, and shellac. The poems of Paul Celan have played a role in developing Kiefer’s themes of German history and the horror of the Holocaust, as have the spiritual concepts of Kabbalah.

In his entire body of work, Kiefer argues with the past and addresses taboo and controversial issues from recent history. Themes from Nazi rule are particularly reflected in his work; for instance, the painting Margarethe (oil and straw on canvas) was inspired by Celan’s well-known poem “Todesfuge” (“Death Fugue”).

His works are characterised by an unflinching willingness to confront his culture’s dark past, and unrealised potential, in works that are often done on a large, confrontational scale well suited to the subjects.

It is also characteristic of his work to find signatures and names of people of historical importance, legendary figures or historical places. All of these are encoded sigils through which Kiefer seeks to process the past; this has resulted in his work being linked with the movements New Symbolism and Neo–Expressionism.

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anselm_Kiefer & https://www.britannica.com/biography/Anselm-Kiefer https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/anselm-kiefer-1406#:~:text=Anselm%20Kiefer%20(born%208%20March,clay%2C%20lead%2C%20and%20shellac.

Photo Attribution (Photographer Unstated), Anslem Keifer, (Cropped, Date Unstated)

Source Attributionhttps://www.famouspainters.net/anselm-kiefer/

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Louise Joséphine Bourgeois (1911 -2010) was a French-American artist.

Although she is best known for her large-scale sculpture and installation art, Bourgeois was also a prolific painter and printmaker.

She explored a variety of themes over the course of her long career including domesticity and the family, sexuality and the body, as well as death and the unconscious.

These themes connect to events from her childhood which she considered to be a therapeutic process.

Although Bourgeois exhibited with the Abstract Expressionists and her work has much in common with Surrealism and Feminist art, she was not formally affiliated with any particular artistic movement.

Early on, Bourgeois focused on painting and printmaking, turning to sculpture only in the later 1940s.

However, by the 1950s and early 1960s, there are gaps in her production as she became immersed in psychoanalysis.

In 1964, for an exhibition after a long hiatus, Bourgeois presented strange, organically shaped plaster sculptures that contrasted dramatically with the totemic wood pieces she had exhibited earlier.

Alternating between forms, materials, and scale, and veering between figuration and abstraction such ideas became a basic part of Bourgeois’s vision, even while she continually probed the same themes: loneliness, jealousy, anger, and fear.

Bourgeois’s idiosyncratic approach found few champions in the years when formal issues dominated art world thinking.

By the 1970s and 1980s, the focus in art had shifted to the examination of various kinds of imagery and content.

In 1982, at 70 years old, Bourgeois finally took centre stage with a retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art.

After the retrospective, she was filled with new confidence and forged ahead, creating monumental spiders, eerie room-sized “Cells,” evocative figures often hanging from wires, and a range of fabric works fashioned from her old clothes.

All the while she constantly made drawings on paper, day and night, and also returned to printmaking.

Art was her tool for coping; it was an exorcism. As Bourgeois put it,

“Art is a guarantee of sanity.”

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Bourgeois & https://www.moma.org/artists/710

Photo Attribution © Christopher Felver, Louise Bourgeois, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_Bourgeois#/media/File:Louise_Bourgeois.jpg

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Abraham (Abe) Ajay (1919–1998) was an American artist and illustrator who was best known for his artistic contributions for The New Masses magazine during the late 1930s and early 1940s. 

The artist is also known for his creative use of reliefs made of found objects during the 1960s and beyond. 

From an early age, Ajay had a passion for art and sought to harness his artistic abilities when he made the decision to move to New York City to pursue his art studies

While studying in New York, Ajay became close friends with Ad Reinhardt, the art director for the left-wing culture magazine The New Masses, who inspired him to begin working for the magazine.

Ajay’s contributions during the late 1930s and early 1940s to New Masses were significant.

Along with Reinhardt, Ajay helped to shape the artistic direction of New Masses during a period where the magazine incurred financial hardships.

Ajay’s contributions of covers and cartoons helped to give New Masses a strong artistic presence despite the overall decline of the magazine during the period. 

A lack of funding helped precipitate Ajay’s departure from New Masses and as the years went on, his support for Communism waned.

In the 1960s Ajay began to produce reliefs made of found objects. Later his often intricate constructions, created from tooled wood, gypsum and cast plastics, reminded many art historians of the sculptures of Louise Nevelson.

In addition, many critics believe that Ajay’s work illustrates religious architecture. It was during this time period where Ajay achieved considerable acclaim within the art community.

Ajay’s work is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington. 

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abe_Ajay

Photo Attribution (Photographer Unstated), Abe Ajay, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.discogs.com/fr/artist/3424360-Abe-Ajay

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day


Louis L’Amour, original name Louis Dearborn Lamoore, pseudonym Tex Burns, or Jim Mayo, (born March 22, 1908, Jamestown, N.D., U.S.—died June 10, 1988, Los Angeles, Calif.), American writer, best-selling author of more than 100 books, most of which were formula westerns that were highly popular because of their well-researched portrayals of frontier life.

L’Amour, who left school at the age of 15, was a world traveller who mined in the West, sailed aboard an East African schooner, lived with bandits in Tibet, and worked as an elephant handler, a professional boxer, and a fruit picker before embarking on a career as a writer in the 1940s.

Since “L’Amour” seemed an unlikely name for an author of westerns, he used pseudonyms until his novel Hondo (1953) became a successful motion picture starring John Wayne (1954), prompting L’Amour to write under his own name.

His books sold 200 million copies in 20 languages, and at least 30 of his books formed the basis of films, including Kilkenny (1954), Guns of the Timberland (1955), The Burning Hills (1956), and How the West Was Won (1963).

In 1983 he became the first novelist to receive a Congressional Gold Medal, and in the following year he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. His autobiography, Education of a Wandering Man, was published posthumously in 1989.

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Louis-LAmour