Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh paintings

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Painting Attribution © Bridget Riley, Fête, 1989

Source Attribution https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/riley-fete-p78333

Bridget Riley

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880 – 1938) was a German expressionist painter and printmaker and one of the founders of the artists group Die Brücke or “The Bridge”, a key group leading to the foundation of Expressionism in 20th-century art.

Kirchner worked at a feverish pace, producing art that drew its subject matter from his studio life with artist friends and models, the street and nightclub life of the city, and summer trips to beaches.

Kirchner’s works were exhibited and collected from 1905, and by the mid-teens Kirchner had a number of devoted collectors, both private and institutional.

At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, Kirchner joined the German army, but eventually suffered a nervous breakdown.

Despite ill health and struggles to recover, he continued to produce major paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture. In 1917 he moved to Davos, Switzerland, and began to include in his work images of rural life and the surrounding Alps.

Through the 1920s major exhibitions of Kirchner’s work were held in Berlin, Frankfurt, Dresden, and other cities. In 1931 he was made a member of the Prussian Academy.

Labelled a degenerate artist by the Nazis, Kirchner was asked to resign from the Berlin Academy of Arts in 1933. In 1937, more than 600 of his works were confiscated from German museums and were either destroyed or sold, many ending up in America.

In 1938 the psychological suffering caused by the Nazi authorities rejecting him as “un-German,” the dispersal and destruction of his works, and the Nazi occupation of Austria so close to his home in Davos led to Kirchner’s suicide.

The first public exhibition of Kirchner’s work in the United States was at the Armory Show of 1913, the first comprehensive exhibition of modern art in America. U.S. museum acquisitions of Kirchner’s work began in 1921 and steadily increased through the next four decades.

Kirchner was given his first one-man museum show in the U.S. at the Detroit Institute of Arts in 1937.

The National Gallery of Art, Washington, held a monographic exhibition of Kirchner’s art in 1992, based on works in the collections of the Gallery and its donors, and then held a major international loan exhibition of Kirchner’s art in 2003.

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.nga.gov/collection/artist-info.1436.html

Photo Attribution © Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Self Portrait, 1919

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Ludwig_Kirchner#/media/File:Kirchner_1919_portrait.jpg

Painting Attribution © Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Böhmischer Waldsee (Bohemian Forest Lake), 1911

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Ludwig_Kirchner#/media/File:Ernst_Ludwig_Kirchner,_1911,_Bohemian_Forest_Lake,_81_x_90.6_cm,_Pinakothek_der_Moderne.jpg

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Hans Hofmann (1880 -1966) was a German-born American painter, renowned as both an artist and teacher.

© Arnold Newman, Hans Hofmann 1960

Hofmann’s career spanned two generations and two continents, and is considered to have both preceded and influenced Abstract Expressionism.

Born and educated near Munich, he was active in the early twentieth-century European avant-garde and brought a deep understanding and synthesis of Symbolism, Neo-impressionism, Fauvism, and Cubism when he emigrated to the United States in 1932.

Hofmann’s painting is characterized by its rigorous concern with pictorial structure and unity, spatial illusionism, and use of bold color for expressive means.

The influential critic Clement Greenberg considered Hofmann’s first New York solo show at Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century in 1944 (along with Jackson Pollock’s in late 1943) as a breakthrough in painterly versus geometric abstraction that heralded abstract expressionism.

In the decade that followed, Hofmann’s recognition grew through numerous exhibitions, notably at the Kootz Gallery, culminating in major retrospectives at the Whitney Museum of American Art (1957) and Museum of Modern Art (1963), which traveled to venues throughout the United States, South America, and Europe.

Hofmann’s works are in the permanent collections of major museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Modern, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, National Gallery of Art, and Art Institute of Chicago.

Hofmann is also regarded as one of the most influential art teachers of the 20th century.

Hofmann’s teaching had a significant influence on post-war American avant-garde artists—including Helen Frankenthaler, Nell Blaine, Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Louise Nevelson, and Larry Rivers, among many—as well as on the theories of Greenberg, in his emphasis on the medium, picture plane, and unity of the work.

Some of Hofmann’s other key tenets include his push/pull spatial theories, his insistence that abstract art has its origin in nature, and his belief in the spiritual value of art.

© Hans Hofmann, Self Portrait with Brushes, 1942

Hofmann created many self-portrait drawings and paintings, usually depicting himself at work.

Self-Portrait with Brushes is typical of his approach, yet it stands out in the way it combines styles to create an expressive character sketch.

Using bold outlines to exaggerate his own features – creating a broad triangular nose and tousled hair – Hofmann projects a playful persona in a blue on yellow palette set within the interior space of his studio.

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Hofmann

Photo Attribution © Arnold Newman, Hans Hofmann 1960

Source Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Hans-Hofmann

Painting Attribution © Hans Hofmann, Self Portrait with Brushes, 1942

Source Attribution https://www.wikiart.org/en/hans-hofmann/self-portrait-with-brushes-1942

About the Painting Attribution https://www.theartstory.org/artist/hofmann-hans/artworks/#pnt_2

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Fleur Adcock (1934 -) is a New Zealand poet and editor, of English and Northern Irish ancestry, who has lived much of her life in England.

Adcock is well-represented in New Zealand poetry anthologies, was awarded an honorary doctorate of literature from Victoria University of Wellington, and was awarded an OBE in 1996 for her contribution to New Zealand literature.

In 2008 she was made a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit, for services to literature.

Adcock worked as an assistant lecturer in classics and librarian at the University of Otago in Dunedin between 1958 and 1962, and as a librarian at the Alexander Turnbull Library in Wellington between 1962 and 1963.

In 1963, Adcock returned to England and took up a post as a librarian at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London.

Adcock had already had poems published in a few literary journals in New Zealand at this time.[6] Her first collection of poetry, The Eye of the Hurricane, was published in New Zealand in 1964, and in 1967 Tigers was her first collection published in Britain.

In 1975, Adcock returned briefly to New Zealand for the first time since she had left for London, and on returning to London in 1976, she became a full time writer.

Adcock was the Arts Council Creative Writing Fellow at the Charlotte Mason College of Education in Windermere from 1977-1978, followed by the Northern Arts Literary Fellowship at the universities of Newcastle and Durham from 1979–1981.

Since 1980, Adcock has worked as a freelance writer, living in East Finchley, north London, a translator and poetry commentator for the BBC.

Adcock’s poetry is typically concerned with themes of place, human relationships and everyday activities, but frequently with a dark twist given to the mundane events she writes about.

Formerly, Adcock’s early work was influenced by her training as a classicist but her more recent work is looser in structure and more concerned with the world of the unconscious mind.

The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature (2006) notes that her poems are often written from the perspective of an outsider or express a divided sense of identity inherited from her own emigrant experience and separation from New Zealand family.

In 2006, Adcock won one of Britain’s top poetry awards, the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, for her collected works, Poems 1960-2000.

Leaving the Tate by Fleur Adcock

Coming out with your clutch of postcards
in a Tate gallery bag and another clutch
of images packed into your head you pause
on the steps to look across the river

and there’s a new one: light bright buildings,
a streak of brown water, and such a sky
you wonder who painted it – Constable? No:
too brilliant. Crome? No: too ecstatic –

a madly pure Pre-Raphaelite sky,
perhaps, sheer blue apart from the white plumes
rushing up it (today, that is,
April. Another day would be different

but it wouldn’t matter. All skies work.)
Cut to the lower right for a detail:
seagulls pecking on mud, below
two office blocks and a Georgian terrace.

Now swing to the left, and take in plane-trees
bobbled with seeds, and that brick building,
and a red bus…Cut it off just there,
by the lamp-post. Leave the scaffolding in.

That’s your next one. Curious how
these outdoor pictures didn’t exist
before you’d looked at the indoor pictures,
the ones on the walls. But here they are now,

marching out of their panorama
and queuing up for the viewfinder
your eye’s become. You can isolate them
by holding your optic muscles still.

You can zoom in on figure studies
(that boy with the rucksack), or still lives,
abstracts, townscapes. No one made them.
The light painted them. You’re in charge

of the hanging committee. Put what space
you like around the ones you fix on,
and gloat. Art multiplies itself.
Art’s whatever you choose to frame.

Bio Reference Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleur_Adcock

Photo Attribution © Caroline Forbes, Fleur Adcock, (Date Unststed)

Source Attribution https://literature.britishcouncil.org/writer/fleur-adcock

Poem Attribution © Fleur Adcock, Leaving the Tate

Source Attribution https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/leaving-the-tate/

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Open Box – Art quotation of the day

Keith Haring (1958 -1990) American graphic artist and designer who popularized some of the strategies and impulses of graffiti art.

Haring, with fellow artists Kenny Scharf and Jean-Michel Basquiat, immersed himself in the punk clubs and street art scene of New York.

In 1981 he began drawing graffiti—unauthorized chalk drawings on blank black advertising panels—in the New York subways. These would eventually number in the thousands, and they quickly created a popular following for his lively figural and patterned imagery and his cheekily outlaw activity.

Haring shared few of the “tagging” tactics of urban graffitists, being drawn instead to the possibilities of a new public and vernacular kind of signage.

Haring began making large outdoor murals, eventually executing them in Rio de Janeiro, Berlin, Melbourne, Chicago, Atlanta, and elsewhere, often assisted by scores of children.

Haring’s ebullient personality, infectious sense of play, and universally understood hieroglyphic style brought him attention from the mainstream press and transferred easily into his work in music videos and fashion design.

In 1986 Haring opened a store called the Pop Shop in New York City, where he marketed products that ranged from T-shirts and pin-on buttons to original prints. He opened a Tokyo branch of the shop in 1988.

Haring’s imagery has “become a widely recognized visual language”. His later work often addressed political and societal themes—especially homosexuality and AIDS—through his own iconography.

Haring was socially conscious, and his murals often reflected his position on social issues. He sought to raise awareness of AIDS and fought against the proliferation of illegal drugs. He died of complications of AIDS at age 31.

In 2014 Haring was one of the inaugural honourees in the Rainbow Honor Walk, a walk of fame in San Francisco’s Castro neighbourhood noting LGBTQ people who have “made significant contributions in their fields.”

In June 2019, Haring was one of the inaugural fifty American “pioneers, trailblazers, and heroes” inducted on the National LGBTQ Wall of Honour within the Stonewall National Monument (SNM) in New York City’s Stonewall Inn.

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Keith-Haring & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Haring

Photo Attribution © Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Keith Haring, (Cropped, Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.thebroad.org/art/keith-haring

Documentary Attribution ©M2M, Discover the King of Street Art: Keith Haring

Video Attribution M2M – Made To Measure

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Q7K3DWILM

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