Poetry Plus – Music in the Bush – A poem by Robert William Service

Music in the Bush by Robert William Service (Excerpt)

Shadows Death Robed Lie

Shadows death robed lie
Sorrow’s moonlit meadows sleep
Silence mourning weeps

Robert William Service, (1874 -1958) the renowned poet of the Yukon, was born in England, The son of a bank cashier, Service was the eldest of four siblings. At the age of five, Service went to Scotland to live with his grandfather and three young aunts.He rejoined his family in 1883 when they too moved to Scotland.

Service attended the University of Glasgow to study English Literature. He was quickly identified as one of the brightest in his class, though he also proved to be a bit audacious.

His essay on Ophelia’s questionable “purity” in Hamlet was received with disgust by his professor, who called Service’s interpretation of the text obscene. Not content with such a response, Service challenged the professor to a fight outside the classroom; the challenge was declined. After a year, the embittered young poet left the university.

Soon afterwards his interests realigned with his aims for adventure. His reading turned to Rudyard Kipling and Robert Louis Stevenson, and their stories of world explorers in search of fortune and, more important, their own identity.

In 1895, at the age of twenty-one, with a significant amount of savings, Robert announced his dream of going to Western Canada to become a cowboy. He soon set sail for Montreal with only his suitcase and a letter of reference from the bank where he had been working.

Upon arrival, Service took a train across Canada to Vancouver Island, where he lived for many years and gathered much of the material for what became his most celebrated poems.

Many of his experiences working on cowboy ranches, and the colourful personalities he met during his travels around the West, eventually found their place in his work.

Numerous publications followed, including Songs of a Sourdough, published in 1907, which won wide acclaim.

His forty-five verse collections accumulated over one thousand poems, the most famous of which include “The Cremation of Sam McGee,” “The Shooting of Dan McGrew,” and “The Men That Don’t Fit In.”

To add to his poetic output, Service wrote two autobiographies, Ploughman of the Moon (1945) and Harper of Heaven (1948), as well as six novels.

His poem about Dan McGrew and several of his novels were adapted to film. The poet himself managed even to garner an acting credit, appearing briefly opposite Marlene Dietrich in the 1942 movie The Spoilers.

Service is often referred to as “the Canadian Kipling” for rollicking ballads of the “frozen North”.

Service served as an ambulance driver during World War I, after which he published Rhymes of a Red Cross Man (Barse & Hopkins, 1916), a collection of mostly war poems.

By the end of his life, his prolific and prosperous career in poetry had earned him the distinction—as stated in an obituary in the Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph—as

“the people’s poet.”

Poem 1 Attribution © Robert William Service, Music in the Bush (Excerpt)

Source Attribution https://mypoeticside.com/show-classic-poem-26338

Haiku Attribution Goff James, Shadows Death Robed Lie

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Bio Attribution Reference https://poets.org/poet/robert-w-service

Photo 1 Attribution © (Photographer Unstated), Robert William Service, c.1905

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_W._Service#/media/File:Robert_W._Service.jpg

Painting Attribution © Auke Mulder, Great Silence, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Great-silence/289339/6629119/view

Poem 2 Attribution © Robert William Service, The Shooting of Dan McGrew

Video Attribution Mobilecheese

Source Attribution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqdL6bTiMhE

Music In The Bush by Robert William Service

O’er the dark pines she sees the silver moon,
And in the west, all tremulous, a star;
And soothing sweet she hears the mellow tune
Of cow-bells jangled in the fields afar.

Quite listless, for her daily stent is done,
She stands, sad exile, at her rose-wreathed door,
And sends her love eternal with the sun
That goes to gild the land she’ll see no more.

The grave, gaunt pines imprison her sad gaze,
All still the sky and darkling drearily;
She feels the chilly breath of dear, dead days
Come sifting through the alders eerily.

Oh, how the roses riot in their bloom!
The curtains stir as with an ancient pain;
Her old piano gleams from out the gloom
And waits and waits her tender touch in vain.

But now her hands like moonlight brush the keys
With velvet grace — melodious delight;
And now a sad refrain from over seas
Goes sobbing on the bosom of the night;

And now she sings. (O! singer in the gloom,
Voicing a sorrow we can ne’er express,
Here in the Farness where we few have room
Unshamed to show our love and tenderness,

Our hearts will echo, till they beat no more,
That song of sadness and of motherland;
And, stretched in deathless love to England’s shore,
Some day she’ll hearken and she’ll understand.)

A prima-donna in the shining past,
But now a mother growing old and gray,
She thinks of how she held a people fast
In thrall, and gleaned the triumphs of a day.

She sees a sea of faces like a dream;
She sees herself a queen of song once more;
She sees lips part in rapture, eyes agleam;
She sings as never once she sang before.

She sings a wild, sweet song that throbs with pain,
The added pain of life that transcends art —
A song of home, a deep, celestial strain,
The glorious swan-song of a dying heart.

A lame tramp comes along the railway track,
A grizzled dog whose day is nearly done;
He passes, pauses, then comes slowly back
And listens there — an audience of one.

She sings — her golden voice is passion-fraught,
As when she charmed a thousand eager ears;
He listens trembling, and she knows it not,
And down his hollow cheeks roll bitter tears.

She ceases and is still, as if to pray;
There is no sound, the stars are all alight —
Only a wretch who stumbles on his way,
Only a vagrant sobbing in the night.

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – Flowers in Winter – A poem by John Greenleaf Whittier

Flowers in Winter (Excerpt) by John Greenleaf Whittier

Morning Wakes Frost Bound

Morning wakes frost bound
Winter’s fragile light gleams pale
Silence white robed clings

John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 -1892) American poet and abolitionist who, in the latter part of his life, shared with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow the distinction of being a household name in both England and the United States.

© (Photographer Unstated), John Greenleaf Whittier, ( c.1840-1860)

Whittier had only a limited formal education. He became an avid reader of British poetry, however, and was especially influenced by the Scot Robert Burns, whose lyrical treatment of everyday rural life reinforced his own inclination to be a writer.

Whittier’s career naturally divides into four periods: poet and journalist (1826–32), abolitionist (1833–42), writer and humanitarian (1843–65), and Quaker poet (1866–92).

At age 19 he submitted his poem “The Exile’s Departure” to the abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison for publication in the Newburyport Free Press, and it was accepted. Garrison encouraged other poetic contributions from Whittier, and the two men became friends and associates in the abolitionist cause.

Whittier turned to journalism. He edited newspapers in Boston and Haverhill and by 1830 had become editor of the New England Weekly Review in Hartford, Connecticut, the most important Whig journal in New England.

Whittier also continued writing verse, sketches, and tales, and he published his first volume of poems, Legends of New England, in 1831.

After 1831 Whittier rembraced Garrisonian abolitionism. His fiery antislavery pamphlet Justice and Expediency made him prominent in the abolition movement, and for a decade he was probably its most influential writer.

He served a term in the Massachusetts legislature, spoke at antislavery meetings, and edited the Pennsylvania Freeman (1838–40) in Philadelphia.

In 1840 he returned to live with his mother, aunt, and sister.

© Daderot, John Greenleaf Whittier Home, Amesbury, Mass.

Whittier’s mother and his beloved younger sister died in the period from 1857 to 1864, but his personal grief, combined with the larger national grief of the Civil War, furthered his literary maturity.

The publication in 1866 of his best-known poem, the winter idyll Snow-Bound, was followed by other triumphs in the verse collections The Tent on the Beach (1867), Among the Hills (1868), and The Pennsylvania Pilgrim (1872).

Whittier’s 70th birthday was celebrated at a dinner attended by almost every prominent American writer, and his 80th birthday became an occasion for national celebration.

After outgrowing the Romantic verse he wrote in imitation of Robert Burns, Whittier became an eloquent advocate of justice, tolerance, and liberal humanitarianism.

The lofty spiritual and moral values he proclaimed earned him the title of “America’s finest religious poet,” and many of his poems are still sung as church hymns by various denominations.

After the Civil War he changed his focus, depicting nature and homely incidents in rural life. Whittier’s best poems are still read for their moral beauty and simple sentiments.

Poem Attribution © John Greenleaf Whittier, Flowers in Winter (Excerpt)

Source Attribution https://www.poetry-archive.com/w/flowers_in_winter.html

Haiku Attribution Goff James, Morning Wakes Frost Bound

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More haiku poems by Goff James

Bio Attribution Reference https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Greenleaf-Whittier

Photo 1 Attribution © (Photographer Unstated), John Greenleaf Whittier, ( c.1840-1860)

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Greenleaf_Whittier#/media/File:John_Greenleaf_Whittier_BPL_ambrotype,_c1840-60-crop.jpg

Photo 2 Attribution © Daderot, John Greenleaf Whittier Home, Amesbury, Mass., (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.britannica.com/place/Amesbury-Massachusetts#ref663284

Painting Attribution © Marianne Quinzin, Bloom 07, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Bloom-07-Winter-garden/961805/4674738/view

Flowers in Winter by John Greenleaf Whittier

How strange to greet, this frosty morn,
In graceful counterfeit of flower,
These children of the meadows, born
Of sunshine and of showers!

 
How well the conscious wood retains
The pictures of its flower-sown home,
The lights and shades, the purple stains,
And golden hues of bloom!

 
It was a happy thought to bring
To the dark season’s frost and rime
This painted memory of spring,
This dream of summertime.

 
Our hearts are lighter for its sake,
Our fancy’s age renews its youth,
And dim-remembered fictions take
The guise of present truth.

 
A wizard of the Merrimac,–
So old ancestral legends say,–
Could call green leaf and blossom back
To frosted stem and spray.

 
The dry logs of the cottage wall,
Beneath his touch, put out their leaves;
The clay-bound swallow, at his call,
Played round the icy eaves.

 
The settler saw his oaken flail
Take bud, and bloom before his eyes;
From frozen pools he saw the pale
Sweet summer lilies rise.

 
To their old homes, by man profaned
Came the sad dryads, exiled long,
And through their leafy tongues complained
Of household use and wrong.

 
The beechen platter sprouted wild,
The pipkin wore its old-time green,
The cradle o’er the sleeping child
Became a leafy screen.

 
Haply our gentle friend hath met,
While wandering in her sylvan quest,
Haunting his native woodlands yet,
That Druid of the West;

 
And while the dew on leaf and flower
Glistened in the moonlight clear and still,
Learned the dusk wizard’s spell of power,
And caught his trick of skill.

 
But welcome, be it new or old,
The gift which makes the day more bright,
And paints, upon the ground of cold
And darkness, warmth and light!

 
Without is neither gold nor green;
Within, for birds, the birch-logs sing;
Yet, summer-like, we sit between
The autumn and the spring.

 
The one, with bridal blush of rose,
And sweetest breath of woodland balm,
And one whose matron lips unclose
In smiles of saintly calm.

 
Fill soft and deep, O winter snow!
The sweet azalea’s oaken dells,
And hide the banks where roses blow
And swing the azure bells!

 
O’erlay the amber violet’s leaves,
The purple aster’s brookside home,
Guard all the flowers her pencil gives
A live beyond their bloom.

 
And she, when spring comes round again,
By greening slope and singing flood
Shall wander, seeking, not in vain
Her darlings of the wood.

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – First Sight – A poem by Philip Larkin

First Sight by Philip Larkin

Springtime Lambing Wakes

Springtime lambing wakes
The passing of seasons spied
Winter surrenders

Philip Larkin (Philip Arthur Larkin, 1922 -1985) an English poet, novelist, and librarian.

Larkin is most highly regarded as the poet who gave expression to a clipped, antiromantic sensibility prevalent in English verse in the 1950s.

Larkin’s first book of poetry, The North Ship, was published in 1945, followed by two novels, Jill (1946) and A Girl in Winter (1947), and he came to prominence in 1955 with the publication of his second collection of poems, The Less Deceived, followed by The Whitsun Weddings (1964) and High Windows (1974).

He contributed to The Daily Telegraph as its jazz critic from 1961 to 1971, articles gathered in All What Jazz: A Record Diary 1961–71 (1985), and he edited The Oxford Book of Twentieth Century English Verse (1973).

His many honours include the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. He was offered, but declined, the position of Poet Laureate in 1984, following the death of Sir John Betjeman.

Poem Attribution © Philip Larkin, First Sight

Source Attribution https://hellopoetry.com/poem/68923/first-sight/

Haiku Attribution Goff James, Springtime Lambing Wakes

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More haiku poems by Goff James

Bio Attribution Reference https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Larkin

Photo Attribution © (Photographer Unstated), Getty Images / Radio Times

Source Attribution http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ2Vu2XQdAeBD3glWJ9i2mQRKva7c1bwvVW5fpMKO53_GVMxvjRGYC6Vhe_HvH2

Painting Attribution © Seren Bell, Twin Lambs Full Moon, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://fossegallery.com/artists/seren-bell/#gallery-14

First Sight by Philip Larkin 

Lambs that learn to walk in snow
When their bleating clouds the air
Meet a vast unwelcome, know
Nothing but a sunless glare.

Newly stumbling to and fro
All they find, outside the fold,
Is a wretched width of cold.

As they wait beside the ewe,
Her fleeces wetly caked, there lies
Hidden round them, waiting too,
Earth’s immeasureable surprise.

They could not grasp it if they knew,
What so soon will wake and grow
Utterly unlike the snow.

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – Sobre Las Olas (On The Waves) – A poem by Jean Cocteau

Sobre Las Olas by Jean Cocteau

Ah Joy Joy Such Joy

Ah joy joy such joy
Round and round love’s secrets spin
Summer’s carousel

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (1889 -1963) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, designer, filmmaker, visual artist and critic.

Cocteau insisted on calling himself a poet, classifying the great variety of his works – poems, novels, plays, essays, drawings, films – as “poésie”, “poésie de roman”, “poésie de thêatre”, “poésie critique”, “poésie graphique” and “poésie cinématographique”.

From 1900 to 1904, Cocteau attended the Lycée Condorcet where he met and began a relationship with schoolmate Pierre Dargelos, who would reappear throughout Cocteau’s oeuvre.

Cocteau published his first volume of poems, Aladdin’s Lamp, at nineteen. Cocteau soon became known in Bohemian artistic circles as The Frivolous Prince, the title of a volume he published at twenty-two.

Edith Wharton described him as a man

“to whom every great line of poetry was a sunrise, every sunset the foundation of the Heavenly City…”

Poem Attribution © Jean Cocteau, Sobre Las Olas (On The Waves)

Source Attribution https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sobre-las-olas-on-the-waves/

Senryū Attribution Goff James, Ah Joy Joy Such Joy

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senrū poems by Goff James

Bio Attribution Reference https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Cocteau

Painting 2 Attribution Amedeo Modigliani, Jean Cocteau, (1916)

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Cocteau#/media/File:1916,_Modigliani,_Jean_Cocteau.jpg

Painting 1 Attribution © Natasha Malenkova, Emerald Wave, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Emerald-Wave/1463701/7175489/view

Sobre Las Olas (On The Waves) by Jean Cocteau

The boys in striped knitware
make the waves sprout–is it a storm?
Everything coos and the bathing girl
consults the mirror of the skies

Waltz, emerald carriages
As a rosebush swells its sides
Once more on the merry-go-round
Spring at the bottom of the sea.

Thank you for your visit.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – To Music ~ A Song – A poem by Robert Herrick

© Shalev Mann, String Quartet #71, (Canvas ’14)

To Music ~ A Song by Robert Herrick

Ah Music Music

Ah music music
Stiller of the troubled brow
Tamer of the beast

Robert Herrick, (1591 -1674), English cleric and poet, the most original of the “sons of Ben [Jonson],” who revived the spirit of the ancient classic lyric.

He is best remembered for the line “Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,” and is counted among the Cavalier poets.

Almost forgotten in the 18th century, and in the 19th century alternately applauded for his poetry’s lyricism and condemned for its “obscenities,”

Robert Herrick nowadays is recognized as one of the most accomplished nondramatic poets of his age. Long dismissed as merely a “minor poet” and, as a consequence, neglected or underestimated by scholars and critics

Herrick wrote elegies, satires, epigrams, love songs to imaginary mistresses, marriage songs, complimentary verse to friends and patrons, and celebrations of rustic and ecclesiastical festivals.

The appeal of Herrick’s poetry lies in its truth to human sentiments and its perfection of form and style.

Frequently light, worldly, and hedonistic and making few pretensions to intellectual profundity, it yet covers a wide range of subjects and emotions, ranging from lyrics inspired by rural life to wistful evocations of life and love’s evanescence and fleeting beauty.

Herrick’s lyrics are notable for their technical mastery and the interplay of thought, rhythm, and imagery that they display. As such, they are typical of the Cavalier poets, a group identifiable by its politics—loyal to Charles I during the English Civil Wars—and the distinct tone and style of its members’ verse.

As a poet, Herrick was steeped in the classical tradition; he was also influenced by English folklore and lyrics, by Italian madrigals, by the Bible and patristic literature, and by contemporary English writers, notably Jonson and Robert Burton.

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Robert-Herrick-English-clergyman-and-poet

Poem Attribution © Robert Herrick, To Music ~ A Song

Source Attribution https://allpoetry.com/To-Music:-A-Song

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Robert-Herrick-English-clergyman-and-poet & https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/robert-herrick

Image Attribution Niccolò Schiavonetti, Robert Herrick, (after Unknown artistline engraving, circa 1790-1813)

Source Attribution https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw39776/Robert-Herrick

Senryū Attribution, Goff James, Ah Music Music

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Painting Attribution © Shalev Mann, String Quartet #71, (Canvas ’14)

Source attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-String-Quartet-71/85398/1938879/view

More Poetry Plus Poems

Thank you for your visit.

Please feel free to share the link to this blog post on your favourite social media networks.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – My Sad Self – A poem by Allen Ginsberg

© Tatiana Bugaenko, Sunset in Manhattan

My Sad Self (Excerpt) by Allen Ginsberg

(To Frank O’Hara)

Twilight Purple Voiced

Twilight purple voiced
Manhattan noise hazed wallows
Silence dust choked coughs

Allen Ginsberg (1926 -1997) one of the most respected Beat writers and acclaimed American poets of his generation, Allen Ginsberg hails from Newark, New Jersey and raised in nearby Paterson, the son of an English teacher and Russian expatriate.

Ginsberg’s early life was marked by his mother’s psychological troubles, including a series of nervous breakdowns.

In 1943, while studying at Columbia University, Ginsberg befriended William Burroughs and Jack Kerouac, and the trio later established themselves as pivotal figures in the Beat Movement.

The group members were known for their unconventional views, and frequently rambunctious behaviour.

Ginsberg first came to public attention in 1956 with the publication of Howl and Other Poems. “Howl,” a long-lined poem in the tradition of Walt Whitman, is an outcry of rage and despair against a destructive, abusive society.

Paul Zweig noted that it “almost singlehandedly dislocated the traditionalist poetry of the 1950s.”

A major theme in Ginsberg’s life and poetry was politics. Kenneth Rexroth called this aspect of Ginsberg’s work “an almost perfect fulfillment of the long, Whitman, Populist, social revolutionary tradition in American poetry.”

My Sad Self by Allen Ginsberg 

(To Frank O’Hara)

Sometimes when my eyes are red
I go up on top of the RCA Building
          and gaze at my world, Manhattan—

                     my buildings, streets I’ve done feats in,
                           lofts, beds, coldwater flats
—on Fifth Ave below which I also bear in mind,
          its ant cars, little yellow taxis, men
               walking the size of specks of wool—

   Panorama of the bridges, sunrise over Brooklyn machine,
          sun go down over New Jersey where I was born
             & Paterson where I played with ants—

   my later loves on 15th Street,
          my greater loves of Lower East Side,
             my once fabulous amours in the Bronx   

                                        faraway—
   paths crossing in these hidden streets,
      my history summed up, my absences   
             and ecstasies in Harlem—

      —sun shining down on all I own
       in one eyeblink to the horizon
               in my last eternity—
                                     matter is water.

Sad,
      I take the elevator and go
             down, pondering,
and walk on the pavements staring into all man’s
                                           plateglass, faces,
             questioning after who loves,

      and stop, bemused
             in front of an automobile shopwindow
      standing lost in calm thought,
             traffic moving up & down 5th Avenue blocks behind me   
                      waiting for a moment when …

Time to go home & cook supper & listen to
                      the romantic war news on the radio   
                                     … all movement stops
& I walk in the timeless sadness of existence,   

      tenderness flowing thru the buildings,
             my fingertips touching reality’s face,
      my own face streaked with tears in the mirror   
             of some window—at dusk—

                                     where I have no desire—
      for bonbons—or to own the dresses or Japanese   
                      lampshades of intellection—

Confused by the spectacle around me,
          Man struggling up the street
                     with packages, newspapers,
                                           ties, beautiful suits   
                     toward his desire

          Man, woman, streaming over the pavements   
                     red lights clocking hurried watches &   
                            movements at the curb—

And all these streets leading
          so crosswise, honking, lengthily,
                            by avenues
          stalked by high buildings or crusted into slums
                            thru such halting traffic

                                           screaming cars and engines   
so painfully to this
          countryside, this graveyard
                     this stillness
                                           on deathbed or mountain  
 
          once seen
                            never regained or desired
                                           in the mind to come
where all Manhattan that I’ve seen must disappear.

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/allen-ginsberg

Poem Attribution © Allen Ginsberg, My Sad Self

Source Attribution https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49307/my-sad-self

Photo Attribution © Cyril H. Baker, Allen Ginsberg, /Pix Inc./The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/allen-ginsberg

Haiku Attribution, Goff James, Twilight Purple Voiced

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More haiku poems by Goff James

Painting Attribution © Tatiana Bugaenko, Sunset in Manhattan, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Sunset-in-Manhattan/656943/2294034/view

Thank you for your visit.

Please feel free to share the link to this blog post on your favourite social media networks.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – The Last Day – A poem by Edward Young

© Nilay Meral, End of the World

The Last Day (Excerpt) by Edward Young

Day Waking Dreams Built

Day waking dreams built
Yesterday’s towers crumble
Morrow’s judgement hid

Edward Young (1683 – 1765) is perhaps one of the lesser recognized English poets of the time. He is now mostly known for a single work, Night Thoughts, though he was a prolific writer who produced a number of popular poems.

Whilst he wrote from an early age, Young only published his first works in 1713 when he was in his thirties.

Young wrote a number of satires under the title The Universal Passion that was published in 1728.

While he was given a pension of £200 from Walpole and earned, it is said, some £3,000 from his Universal Passion satires.

Young was always trying to find people to give more patronage for the poetical works and plays that he created, though he was living in a time when this kind of support for artists was beginning to subside quite dramatically.

Young’s major work is called Night Thoughts, a long and often disjointed work that is notable because it has a number of passages that, when isolated, are considered some the best poetry from the period.

The poem was an enormous success for Young, earning him praise and money in equal measure and it was translated into several different languages and made him famous abroad.

In his late forties Young took Holy Orders and became a royal chaplain, himself marrying Lady Elizabeth Lee. It was a short lived marriage as she died a few years later and he made reference to her in his seminal masterpiece Night Thoughts. Into his dotage,

Young wrote a number of other works including The Centaur Not Fabulous and the long poem Resignation which was composed a few short years before his death.

Poem Attribution © Edward Young, The Last Day (excerpt)

Source Attribution https://mypoeticside.com/show-classic-poem-35394

Bio Reference Attribution https://mypoeticside.com/poets/edward-young-poems

Painting 1 Attribution (Artist Unstated), Edward Young, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://mypoeticside.com/poets/edward-young-poems

Senryū Attribution © Goff James, Day Waking Dreams Built

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

The Last Day (excerpt) by Edward Young

Sooner or later, in some future date,
(A dreadful secret in the book of Fate)
This hour, for aught all human wisdom knows,
Or when ten thousand harvests more have rose;

When scenes are chang’d on this revolving Earth,
Old empires fall, and give new empires birth;
While other Bourbons rule in other lands,
And, (if man’s sin forbids not) other Annes;
While the still busy world is treading o’er
The paths they trod five thousand years before,
Thoughtless as those who now life’s mazes run,
Of earth dissolv’d, or an extinguish’d sun;

(Ye sublunary worlds, awake, awake!
Ye rulers of the nation, hear and shake)
Thick clouds of darkness shall arise on day;
In sudden night all Earth’s dominions lay;
Impetuous winds the scatter’d forests rend;
Eternal mountains, like their cedars, bend;
The valleys yawn, the troubled ocean roar
And break the bondage of his wonted shore;

A sanguine stain the silver moon o’erspread;
Darkness the circle of the sun invade;
From inmost Heaven incessant thunders roll
And the strong echo bound from pole to pole.

Painting 2 Attribution © Nilay Meral, End of the World, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-End-Of-The-World/930772/4844364/view

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Art Photography Poetry

Poetry Plus – Music – A poem by Arthur S. J. Tessimond

© Gabrielle Jones, Earth Music

Music by Arthur S. J. Tessimond

Sunshine and Darkness

Sunshine and darkness
The painting of emotions
Music’s legacy

Arthur Seymour John Tessimond (1902 -1962) was an English poet.

After graduating he tried his hand at teaching but only lasted two terms, whereupon he broke off his engagement and moved to London, working there in bookshops for two years before becoming an advertising copywriter.

At the beginning of the Second World War, he gave up his job and flat and went on the run to avoid conscription, having decided he would be ‘intensively miserable’ as a soldier as well as ‘useless and dangerous to others’. When he finally submitted himself to an army medical, he was declared unfit for service.

Tessimond has been described as an eccentric, a night-lifer, loner and flâneur. He loved women, was always falling in love, but never married.

He published three collections during his lifetime with nearly ten years between each one.

In 1934 he wrote Walls of Glass, ten years later came Voices in a Giant City and in 1958 his final published work Selection was released.

Whilst he was a regular contributor to many poetry magazines through the 30s and 40s with verses such as The Lonely Women in Hotel Lounges.

Tessimond’s poems often contain a touch of satire and humour, though they are all the more human for the tenderness with which he treats his subjects.

Perhaps one of his more poignant short poems On The Death of a Great Man reflects his view of the world, a melancholy tribute to life’s uncaring nature.

His mental health often led him to be hospitalized and he was given electroshock therapy which may well have contributed to his eventual death.

The poet spent most of his life in obscurity and it was only after his death that he began to become more widely recognized.

Poem Attribution © Arthur S. J. Tessimond, Music

Source Attribution https://allpoetry.com/poem/8529603-Music-by-A.S.J.-Tessimond

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.bloodaxebooks.com/ecs/category/a-s-j-tessimond & https://mypoeticside.com/poets/a-s-j-tessimond-poems

Photo Attribution (Potographr Unstated), Arthur S. J. Tessimond, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://mypoeticside.com/poets/a-s-j-tessimond-poems

Senryū Attribution © Goff James, Sunshine and Darkness

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Painting Attribution © Gabrielle Jones, Earth Music, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Earth-Music/81880/3526936/view

Music by Arthur S. J. Tessimond

This shape without space,
This pattern without stuff,
This stream without dimension
Surrounds us, flows through us,
But leaves no mark.

This message without meaning,
These tears without eyes
This laughter without lips
Speaks to us but does not
Disclose its clue.

These waves without sea
Surge over us, smooth us.
These hands without fingers
Close-hold us, caress us.
These wings without birds
Strong-lift us, would carry us
If only the one thread broke.

Thank you for your visit.

Please feel free to share the link to this blog post on your favourite social media networks.

I cordially invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Poetry Plus – Flowers – A poem by Thomas Hood

Flowers by Thomas Hood

Lover’s Sacred Sleep

Lover’s sacred sleep
Flowers in a graveyard lie
Moonlit shadows weep

Thomas Hood, (1799 -1845), English poet, journalist, author and humorist whose humanitarian verses served as models for a whole school of social-protest poets, not only in Britain and the United States but in Germany and Russia, where he was widely translated.

Hood is best known for poems such as “The Bridge of Sighs” and “The Song of the Shirt”. He wrote regularly for The London Magazine, Athenaeum, and Punch.

Hood later published a magazine largely consisting of his own works.

William Michael Rossetti in 1903 called him “the finest English poet” between the generations of Shelley and Tennyson.

He also is notable as a writer of comic verse, having originated several durable forms for that genre.

Poem Attribution © Thomas Hood, Flowers

Source Attribution https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/flowers-2/

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Thomas-Hood & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Hood

Painting 1 Attribution © (Artist Unknown) Thomas Hood, National Portrait Gallery, London / Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Hood#/media/File:Thomas_Hood_from_NPG.jpg

Painting 2 Attribution © Lilia Orlova-Holmes, Rose Garden, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Rose-garden/56416/3626855/view

Haiku Attribution © Goff James, Lover’s Sacred Sleep

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More senryū poems by Goff James

Flowers by Thomas Hood

I will not have the mad Clytie,
Whose head is turned by the sun;
The tulip is a courtly queen,
Whom, therefore, I will shun;

The cowslip is a country wench,
The violet is a nun; –
But I will woo the dainty rose,
The queen of everyone.

The pea is but a wanton witch,
In too much haste to wed,
And clasps her rings on every hand
The wolfsbane I should dread; –

Nor will I dreary rosemary
That always mourns the dead; –
But I will woo the dainty rose,
With her cheeks of tender red.

The lily is all in white, like a saint,
And so is no mate for me –
And the daisy’s cheek is tipped with blush,
She is of such low degree;

Jasmine is sweet, and has many loves,
And the broom’s betrothed to the bee; –
But I will plight with the dainty rose,
For fairest of all is she.

© Copyright


The works referenced here remain the copyright of each individual artist, poets photographer and writer.

© Goff James Art, Photography, Poetry. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited.


Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Goff James, Art, Photography, Poetry and goffjamesartplus with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Thank you for your visit.

Please feel free to share the link to this blog post on your favourite social media networks.

I also invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Poetry Plus – Winter with the Gulf Stream – A poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Winter with the Gulf Stream by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844 -1889) English poet and Jesuit priest, one of the most individual of Victorian writers. His work was not published in collected form until 1918, but it influenced many leading 20th-century poets.

(Photographer Unstated), Gerard Manley Hopkins, (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The poet’s manipulation of prosody – particularly his concept of sprung rhythm – established him as an innovative writer of verse, as did his technique of praising God through vivid use of imagery and nature.

It was only after Hopkin’s death did Robert Bridges begin to publish a few of the poet’s mature poems in anthologies, hoping to prepare the way for wider acceptance of his style.

By 1930 Hopkin’s work was recognised as one of the most original literary accomplishments of his century.

© Thomas C. Bayfield, Alfred William Garrett, William Alexander Comyn Macfarlane and Gerard Manley Hopkins (left to right), 1866

Winter’s Breeze Chilled Voiced

Winter’s breeze chilled voiced
Tree boughs snow weighed bend and bow
Hedgerows frost robed gleam

Hopkin’s posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets; and, his influence is seen in the works of such leading 20th-century poets as T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender and Cecil Day-Lewis.

Poem Attribution © Gerard Manley Hopkins, Winter with the Gulf Stream

Source Attribution https://www.poetrynook.com/poem/winter-gulf-stream

Bio Reference Attribution https://www.britannica.com/biography/Gerard-Manley-Hopkins & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_Manley_Hopkins

Photo 1 Attribution © (Photographer Unstated), Gerard Manley Hopkins, (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_Manley_Hopkins#/media/File:GerardManleyHopkins.jpg

Photo 2 Attribution © Thomas C. Bayfield, Alfred William Garrett, William Alexander Comyn Macfarlane and Gerard Manley Hopkins (left to right), 1866

Source Attribution https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard_Manley_Hopkins#/media/File:Alfred_William_Garrett;_William_Alexander_Comyn_Macfarlane;_Gerard_Manley_Hopkins_by_Thomas_C._Bayfield.jpg

Painting Attribution Neil Erickson, Winter Trees, (Date Unstated)

Source Attribution https://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Winter-Trees/1069841/4120385/view

Haiku Attribution © Goff James, Winter’s Breeze Chilled Voiced

Copyright (c) 2021 Goff James – All Rights Reserved 

More haiku poems by Goff James

Winter with the Gulf Stream by Gerard Manley Hopkins

The boughs, the boughs are bare enough
But earth has never felt the snow.
Frost-furred our ivies are and rough

With bills of rime the brambles shew.
The hoarse leaves crawl on hissing ground
Because the sighing wind is low.

But if the rain-blasts be unbound
And from dank feathers wring the drops
The clogged brook runs with choking sound

Kneading the mounded mire that stops
His channel under clammy coats
Of foliage fallen in the copse.

A simple passage of weak notes
Is all the winter bird dare try.
The bugle moon by daylight floats

So glassy white about the sky,
So like a berg of hyaline,
And pencilled blue so daintily,

I never saw her so divine.
But through black branches, rarely drest
In scarves of silky shot and shine,

The webbed and the watery west
Where yonder crimson fireball sits
Looks laid for feasting and for rest.

I see long reefs of violets
In beryl-covered fens so dim,
A gold-water Pactolus frets

Its brindled wharves and yellow brim,
The waxen colours weep and run,
And slendering to his burning rim

Into the flat blue mist the sun
Drops out and all our day is done.

goffjamesart.wordpress.com

© Copyright


The works referenced here remain the copyright of each individual artist, poets photographer and writer.

© Goff James Art, Photography, Poetry. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited.


Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Goff James, Art, Photography, Poetry and goffjamesartplus with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Thank you for your visit.

Please feel free to share the link to this blog post on your favourite social media networks.

I also invite you to subscribe to Goff James Art Photography Poetry at goffjamesart.wordpress.com (Doing so will allow you to be notified whenever new content is published on my blog).