Reflection

 

Reflection FBO

Goff James,  Reflection, 2017, (Painting, The Three Kingdoms – Heaven, Earth and Hell © Artist Preecha Pun-Klum, MOCA, Bangkok)

Welcome To My Blog.

You are welcome to visit and join me by pressing the my link below.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com/

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

 

The painting, The Three Kingdoms – Heaven, Earth and Hell 

© Artist Preecha Pun-Klum, MOCA, Bangkok

 

The poem used here is the copyright of:

 goffjamesart/photography/poetry

Talking Pictures (20) – Genre: Portrait Photography [Irving Penn]

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Irving Penn, Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, France, 1957

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and the latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the scope of photography and its varied genres that will inform and support a personal project. Today’s topic is Portrait Photography.

Portrait Photography may be defined as;

  • simply creating a likeness of a person, especially of the face.
  • a good quality image that not only captures a person’s physical likeness but also something of the person’s character, generally in a manner that is attractive and pleasing to the subject.

https://www.photographytips.com/page.cfm/368

 

  • simply the depiction of an individual
  • recording the physical form and features of the portrait sitter including characterisation, personal context, possible relationships and often a connection with that persons life, lifestyle and work.
  • conveying a very real and intense sense of the sitters personality, their interests and personal environment.

http://www.photokonnexion.com/definition-portraiture/

 

  • an image depicting only the face or head and shoulders of a subject.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/portrait

 

  • being more than just a visual record that is used to show the power, importance, virtue, beauty, wealth, taste, learning or other qualities of the sitter. 

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/portrait

 

  • capturing the personality of a subject by using effective lighting, backdrops, and poses.
  • being an image of a subject that may be artistic or clinical as part of a medical study.
  • the commissioning of images for special occasions, such as weddings or school events.
  • serving many purposes, from usage on a personal web site to display in the lobby of a business.

Johnson, A., Lecture Notes

A true portrait should, today and a hundred years from today, be the testimony of how this person looked and what kind of human being he was.”

Philippe Halsman

https://www.phototraces.com/creative-photography/famous-portrait-photographers/

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Irving Penn, Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, France, 1957

The subject is framed within the image’s formal design. The curving lines of the hat’s brim and coat collar draws the viewer’s eye in and around the frame to explore the entirety of the composition. Lit from the left side of the frame combined with the creative use of light and shadow imbues the image with a dramatic intensity. This arrangement isolates the subject and removes him from his own everyday reality.

The hat and dark overcoat are the only props utilised within the composition and facilitate an intense engagement not only between the subject and the photographer but also outwards to the viewer and beyond exuding a sense of stillness and serene spirituality. The image presents a cool, even appraisal that neither assaults nor caresses the sitter.

What I really try to do is photograph people at rest, in a state of serenity,’’

Irving Penn (interview with The New York Times Magazine, 1977)

Compositionally minimalistic in form the image presents the subject face half obscured receding in shadow. It is a sparse lustrous head-and-shoulder portrait taken close-up, cropped within the constricting space of the square frame and set against a discreet neutral blurred background.

…. As a result there is a greater emphasis on a subtle exploration of gesture and expression between photographer and sitter.” 

Magdalene Keaney (Art Historian)

 (Irving Penn Portraits. London: National Portrait Gallery, 2010, p. 7.)

The confrontational positioning of the subject close-up to the lens with its focus being directly upon the subject’s highlighted face, the shallow depth of field, precise clarity, severity and impassivity amplifies the sitter’s gesture, expression and powerful persona. The lack of context confuses the viewer’s sense of scale and heightens awareness not just of the sitter’s face and what it reveals, but of what is unseen – the subject’s remoteness and possible vulnerability.

The image captures more than the subject’s character and individuality through the inclusion of the elaborate embroidery on the collar of the overcoat. The tight cropping of Picasso’s face and deep highlight and shadow across it both flattens and breaks the image, into a series of abstract shapes and planes that reflect the cubist mantra of fragmentation.

As Mark Haworth-Booth states in his introduction to Irving Penn Fringes, (PaceWildensteinMacGill exhibition catalogue, 1996, n.p.) :

[it] is literally reflected in Picasso’s left eye.

“It represents not only the world beyond the viewfinder and studio, but also the tool of the current artist at work—the natural, ideally northern, daylight in which Penn preferred to work.

There is a great deal of detail within the print including the photographer’s daylight studio in the reflection of Picasso’s left eye.

 

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Irving Penn, Detail image Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes , 1957

The image, at one level without a title, presents the rejection of any contextual narrative that readily identifies the sitter. However the image’s title suggests otherwise through identifying the sitter. This information arguably changes the context.

Through eschewing any defined background the subject assumes the central role, prompting viewers to focus on the very essence of the sitter,

“[Penn’s photographs] are not stories, but simply pictures.”

John Szarkowski

Director of photography at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, 

The close-up portrait is skilfully and almost perfectly centered around the sitter’s left eye with its penetrating look – a homage to Cubism. The frame, divided into sections, bares the geometric abstraction of the artist’s Cubist period.

Other references to the style are rendered within the image, the embroidery on the overcoat, the eye, the strong tonal contrasts, the collar of the overcoat slicing the face at an unconventional angle, the assembly of bold shapes the abstraction of the ear and the different lines dissecting the plane

The portrait may be compared with Picasso’s grey-toned  Buste de femme “, 26 III, 1956

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Pablo Picasso, Buste de femme “, 26 III 1956

 

and “Portrait de femme à la robe verte”, 1956

d03aa70b9f61247691f3c4a0ba85f53a--picasso-art-pablo-picasso

Pablo Picasso, Portrait de femme à la robe verte”, May 1, 1956

In many ways Penn’s portrait of Picasso becomes more of a probable self-visualisation by Picasso rather than a regimented projection by the photographer of how a portrait should be. The image of Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, possesses a duality of meaning that embraces two great masters, both subtly revealing themselves from different sides of the same lens.

 

Reference List

http://www.archive.boston.com/bostonglobe/obituaries/articles/2009/10/08/irving_penn_92_his_sparse_lustrous_portraits_revealed/

http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/exhibitions/IrvingPennArchives/portraitshttp://www.dptips-central.com/irving-penn.html

https://www.artofplatinum.wordpress.com/category/irving-penn-2/

http://www.npg.org.uk/about/press/irving-penn-portraits1.php

https://www.phillips.com/detail/IRVING-PENN/NY040210/22

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/recycled/2009/10/irving_penn_rip.html

http://www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/close-encounters

https://theredlist.com/wiki-2-16-601-793-view-fashion-1-profile-penn-irving.html

https://www.widewalls.ch/photography-portraits/richard-avedon-marilyn-monroe/

 

Welcome To My Blog.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com/

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

Talking Pictures (19) – Genre: Portrait Photography [Steve McCurry]

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Steve McCurry, Afghan Girl, 1984

Welcome followers and visitors to additional chapter to my blog and the  latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the scope of photography and its varied genres that will inform and support a personal project. Today’s topic is Portrait Photography.

Portrait Photography may be defined as;

  • simply creating a likeness of a person, especially of the face.
  • a good quality image that not only captures a person’s physical likeness but also something of the person’s character, generally in a manner that is attractive and pleasing to the subject.

https://www.photographytips.com/page.cfm/368

 

  • simply the depiction of an individual
  • recording the physical form and features of the portrait sitter including characterisation, personal context, possible relationships and often a connection with that persons life, lifestyle and work.
  • conveying a very real and intense sense of the sitters personality, their interests and personal environment.

http://www.photokonnexion.com/definition-portraiture/

 

  • an image depicting only the face or head and shoulders of a subject.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/portrait

 

  • being more than just a visual record that is used to show the power, importance, virtue, beauty, wealth, taste, learning or other qualities of the sitter. 

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/portrait

 

  • capturing the personality of a subject by using effective lighting, backdrops, and poses.
  • being an image of a subject that may be artistic or clinical as part of a medical study.
  • the commissioning of images for special occasions, such as weddings or school events.
  • serving many purposes, from usage on a personal web site to display in the lobby of a business.

Johnson, A., Lecture Notes

 

A true portrait should, today and a hundred years from today, be the testimony of how this person looked and what kind of human being he was.”

Philippe Halsman

https://www.phototraces.com/creative-photography/famous-portrait-photographers/

 

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Steve McCurry, Afghan Girl, 1984

Compositionally the subject is set off centre of the image facing outwards towards the camera. The slight shift the subject makes to the positioning of her haunting eyes inscribe a sense of dramatic movement imbued with a sense of unseen horror that floods the image with an intense raw energy.

The lighting appears to be natural and coming from both the front and right of frame and entering the space from slightly above and directly from behind the photographer.

The main focus is the subject’s face isolated by its clarity and sharpness within the encircling ragged head wrap which accentuates the piercing eloquent stare of the eyes. The face has no significant dark shadowing causing no loss of the catchlights which flatters and intensifies the subject’s explosive emotive expression.

The rule of thirds subdivides the image compositionally into different spatial planes both horizontally and vertically across the frame.

If one views the image from bottom frame up it exemplifies the rule of thirds vertically and dictates how the image is laid out.

The lower third is composed of the subject’s right shoulder, directly in the foreground, which accentuates the turn of the child’s upper torso mantled in the leading lines of the folds in the rust red garment. The middle third stretching from the girl’s chin to the top of her forehead, includes her face hair, part of the garment’s hood and background. The top third accommodates the top of the subject’s head, hair, hood and the background.

If one views the composition vertically from left to right the first third contains the left side of the subject’s face to the vertical edge of her nose. The central third which stretches to the top of her right cheek bone connecting with a vertical line traversing the edge of her shoulder upwards passing her hidden ear and up to the top of the frame traversing the green vertical line observed in the background. The final third is occupied with the subject’s shoulder, the remainder of her hair, hood and the blurred green background.

Where the lines of the horizontal and vertical planes intersect is where the main focal point of the image is housed – the strident defiant outward turned face and penetrating soul filled eyes.

The shallow depth of field, the contrasting complementary colours of red and green, the green and white of the eyes, the tanned flesh of the face with its muted tones and the blurring of the background infuse the  portrait with significant emotive intensity and regal qualities of the sublime.

The composition is filled with a series of curving leading lines that not only provide a rhythmic energy within the image but draw the viewer to the very heart and focus of the image, the subject’s face and eyes. These elements accentuate the young subject’s hidden femininity, fears and vulnerability.

The curving lines are counterpointed by the vertical lines of her nose and the horizontal structure of her brow bone; which, with the manner in which the image occupies its various spatial structure create a sense of stability revealing an internal strength and determination to survive against all the odds.

“ …I did know that there was a power and that there was something completely special and unusual and extraordinary about this look.”

Steve McCurry

Reference List

http://www.earthporm.com/top-10-famous-portrait-photographers-around-world/

https://mackenziekerrigan.wordpress.com/photo-analysis/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2002/04/afghan-girl/index-text/1

http://resourcemagonline.com/2015/01/12-top-tier-portrait-photographers-you-should-know/47073/

https://www.phototraces.com/creative-photography/famous-portrait-photographers/

Welcome To My Blog.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com/

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

 

All images used here are the copyright of:

© goffjamesart/photography/poetry

Talking Pictures (18) – Genre: Fine Art Photography [Edward Weston]

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Edward Weston, Pepper No 25, 1930

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and the  latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the scope of photography and its varied genres that will inform and support a personal project. Today’s topic is Fine Art Photography.

Fine Art Photography “photographic art”, “artistic photography”  may be defined as;

  • possessing no universally agreed meaning or definition,
  • referring to an imprecise category of photographs, created in accordance with the creative vision of the photographer.
  • not merely capturing a realistic rendition of the subject, but aiming to produce a more personal – typically more evocative or atmospheric – impression.
  • describing any image taken by a camera where the intention is aesthetic rather than scientific, commercial or journalistic.

http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/fine-art-photography.htm

  • as a type of photographythat represents an idea, a message, or an emotion wherein the artist has something that they want to convey in their work.

Johnson, A., Lecture Notes, 2017

  • not being about capturing what the camera sees but about capturing what the artist sees.
  • using the camera as a tool to create a work of art revealing the vision of the artist and making a statement of that vision rather than documenting the subject before the lens.

https://photographylife.com/what-is-fine-art-photography

  • that the recording a subject is not the main purpose.
  • using photography as a means to express a vision and make an artistic statement.

https://mymodernmet.com/what-is-fine-art-photography-definition/

  • the intentional execution of an imagethrough choosing the elements in its structure, framing, appearance, presentation and technical excellence.

https://www.keptlight.com/fine-art-photography/

  • representing or conveying an idea, a message or an emotion.

Johnson, A., Lecture Notes

Screen Shot 2017-11-18 at 16.23.02

Edward Weston, Pepper No 25, 1930

The black and white image fills the frame and depicts with great clarity a solitary, malformed, pepper. The pepper is placed in a tin funnel, which provided not only a curving, undefinable background, but also refracts the lighting. The funnel reflects the soft lighting from above  which highlights the object’s bulbous sensual curving contours, smooth skin and its very vulnerability with the hint of decay. Such decay grounds the subject, heightens the tension between subject and form as well as ideal and real.

Kim Weston (the photographer’s grandson) stated in an interview that:

“…it was shot at an aperture of f/240 with an exposure time of 4-6 hours.

However the photographer states in his writings that:

“… I placed it in the funnel, focused with the Zeiss, and knowing just the viewpoint, recognising a perfect light, made an exposure of six minutes

The anthropomorphic vegetable has been transformed, almost to abstraction, into a sculptural narrative with its long, smooth turning surfaces, glowing light on the tactile skin, gentle folding curves, the exaggerated contrasts between light and dark, concave and convex, rough and smooth surfaces, the light brushwork along the bottom of the photograph all add  contrasting textural qualities. These various elements accentuate the sculptural three dimensionality of the object despite the flatness of the printed image.

The pepper has been transformed from being a mere mundane object the subject of a still life into a piece fine art. The pepper has been transformed into a sensual object with curves that not only echoes Auguste Renoir’s “The Kiss” but also the human form and modernist sculptures the likes of Hans Arp and Henry Moore. The image’s ultra-realism bleeds into the artistic world of abstraction and surrealism.

Edward Weston described it in his Daybooks as:

‘… a classic, completely satisfying, – a pepper – but more than a pepper: abstract, in that it is completely outside subject matter.  It has no psychological attributes, no human emotions are aroused: this new pepper takes one beyond the world we know in the conscious mind. . . .’ (California, p. 181.)

The image makes the commonplace wondrous transforming it into a piece of fine art. The organic form of the pepper is imbued with a spectrum of delicate monochromatic tonal hues, its formal perfection and technical execution heightens its presence to the point where it appears to be almost unreal. The image transcends the mere pictorial and has become an art form in its own right.

By photographing in close-up EW has captured

”… the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself “.

Edward Weston

The pepper has been transformed, in my view, from being a mere mundane object or subject for still life into a piece fine art.

That which is appealing is that EW has created within the object an aesthetic existence of its own

“completely outside subject matter” and “takes one beyond the world we know in the conscious mind”. 

Edward Weston

Reference List

https://petapixel.com/2017/08/15/famous-pepper-photo-edward-weston-4hr-exposure-f240/

httphttp://www.hlphotogallery.com/stories

http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2014/photographs-n09129/lot.24.html

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-weston-edward-artworks.htm

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2010/aug/18/edward-weston-photography

 

Welcome To My Blog

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

Talking Pictures (17) – Genre: Fine Art Photography [Robert Mapplethorpe]

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Robert Mapplethorpe, Calla Lily , 1986

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and the  latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the scope of photography and its varied genres that will inform and support a personal project. Today’s topic is Fine Art Photography.

Fine Art Photography “photographic art”, “artistic photography”  may be defined as;

  • possessing no universally agreed meaning or definition,
  • referring to an imprecise category of photographs, created in accordance with the creative vision of the photographer.
  • not merely capturing a realistic rendition of the subject, but aiming to produce a more personal – typically more evocative or atmospheric – impression.
  • describing any image taken by a camera where the intention is aesthetic rather than scientific, commercial or journalistic.

http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/fine-art-photography.htm

  • as a type of photographythat represents an idea, a message, or an emotion wherein the artist has something that they want to convey in their work.

Johnson, A., Lecture Notes, 2017

  • not being about capturing what the camera sees but about capturing what the artist sees.
  • using the camera as a tool to create a work of art revealing the vision of the artist and making a statement of that vision rather than documenting the subject before the lens.

https://photographylife.com/what-is-fine-art-photography

  • that the recording a subject is not the main purpose.
  • using photography as a means to express a vision and make an artistic statement.

https://mymodernmet.com/what-is-fine-art-photography-definition/

  • the intentional execution of an imagethrough choosing the elements in its structure, framing, appearance, presentation and technical excellence.

https://www.keptlight.com/fine-art-photography/

  • representing or conveying an idea, a message or an emotion.

Johnson, A., Lecture Notes

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Robert Mapplethorpe, Calla Lily , 1986

The initial appeal of this close up still life lies in the sensitive way the photographer presents a crisp edged highly stylised minimalist black and white image of a single inverted calla lily. In so doing the image is imbued with an energised dynamism that underscores it with a powerful presence. The image is iconic in the manner in which RM explores botanical still life photography as a means of art making that transcends genres.

The lily dominates the picture plane through carefully orchestration of the composition by placing the flower directly in the centre of the frame and the use of sophisticated lighting. The image’s subtle gradation of light displays the well-defined lines and the natural shape of the lily. The flower is lit from above which emphasises its paradoxical combination of strength, fragility and ephemerality.

The image’s shallow depth of field and clarity accentuates this and is enhanced further by the careful staging which in turn emphasises the meticulous attention to the harmonious arrangement of the dominating sculptural form and underscore its powerful physical presence within a highly controlled environment.

The lily divides the picture plane both horizontally and vertically creating a stark juxtaposition between the contrasting white and black elements. The leading line of the lily’s curving stem and flower head is echoed by its shadow cast and the of the thin descending sepal which leads the eye directly into the curving blurred pool of light at the bottom of the frame. The blurred line of this pool of light leads the eye around  the shadow of the lily accentuating the presence and sensuality of the lily itself which hovers above it.

The image with its monochromatic minimalist elegance and subtle gradations of grey tones found on the flower’s trumpet head draws the viewer into the composition to explore the image’s spatial juxtapositions and relationships. It is the contrast between the black and white that creates and intensifies the dramatic tension of the image.

The stark white flower head juxtaposed against the extreme black background isolates the object and suffuses it with an air of timelessness, poetic, melancholic and symbolic qualities.

It is these qualities that make the viewer reinterpret any self-imposed initial superficial narrative. The downturned lily can be viewed as a cipher of both masculine and feminine sensuality as well as reflecting a classical physical beauty and aesthetics.

I am obsessed with beauty, I want everything to be perfect, and of course it isn’t. And that’s a tough place to be because you’re never satisfied.

Robert Mapplethorpe

“Taking pictures …and trying to get the best possible view of it.”

Robert Mapplethorpe

It is the sublime erotic element of the lily, that adds to its intrigue, with its drooping head without thinking of the flaccid male member, or the lily’s frilled fringe without visualizing the female vulva. The very precise architectural shape, perfect form and covert sensual suggestive nature of the flower engages the viewer that demands a response and interpretation of the presented narrative. The image initiates a discussion with regard to variety of social issues that includes sexuality, race, mortality and death.

I like to look at pictures, all kinds, and all those things you absorb come out subconsciously one way or another.”

Robert Mapplethorpe

Reference List

https://www.artblart.com/tag/robert-mapplethorpe-calla-lily/

http://www.anothermag.com/art-photography/8524/robert-mapplethorpes-sensual-flowers

http://www.collection.whitney.org/object/11521

http://www.mapplethorpe.org/

https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/5351

www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/robe

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/features/robert-mapplethorpes-petals-and-penises-a-ravishing-new-book-and-major-retrospective-reassess-the-a6911966.h

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/robert-mapplethorpe-11413

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-mapplethorpe-robert-artworks.htm

Welcome To My Blog

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

Talking Pictures (16) – Genre: Conceptual Photography [Christopher Williams]

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Christopher Williams, Kodak Three Point Reflection Guide © 1968 Eastman Kodak Company, 1968 (Meiko laughing), Vancouver, B.C., 2005

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and the very latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the scope of photography and its varied genres that will inform and support a personal project. Today’s topic is Conceptual Photography.

Conceptual Photography may be defined as;

  • a means to stage a false reality, or capture an idea.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-photography

  • being the idea (or concept) behind a work is more important than the finished art object.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-art

  • concerning theconcept of a photo, its message whether it be political, social commentary or an emotional outcry,
  • as possessingsome level of abstraction,
  • as not being an explicit example of a concept, but a general expression of an idea.

http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/photography/articles/39542.aspx

  • a means to stage a false reality, or capture an idea.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-photography

  • being the idea (or concept) behind a work is more important than the finished art object.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-art

  • concerning theconcept of a photo, its message whether it be political, social commentary or an emotional outcry,
  • as possessingsome level of abstraction,
  • as not being an explicit example of a concept, but a general expression of an idea.

http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/photography/articles/39542.aspx

99003

Christopher Williams, Kodak Three Point Reflection Guide © 1968 Eastman Kodak Company, 1968 (Meiko laughing), Vancouver, B.C., 2005

The image, close cropped within the frame, presents a female model with one yellow towel wrapped around her hair and another around her bust. The model is offset to the right side of the frame and takes up two thirds of the vertical and horizontal space.The image presents a staged  re-photographing of a Kodak illustration taken from an instruction manual for amateur photographers published in 1968.

The image overtly displays the typically hidden device of the Kodak colour bar—the “Three Point Reflection Guide”  which was used by photographers to measure the trueness of a colour in a coloured image.

Consequently the dynamic tension within the image is accentuated with its inclusion in the portrait of the model.

The dominant colour within the image is the vibrant yellow an acknowledgement to Kodak’s advertising signature colour. The pose echoes the functionality of catalogue shots, but invests the subject with the unreal sheen of advertising.

The relative pristine simplicity of the compositional elements of the image – the minimalist light palette of colours and the subject isolated against the jet-black background reveals the unexpected beauty and cultural resonance of commercial, industrial and instructional photography.

The immediate appeal of this image is the subversive manner in which CW draws attention to both photography as a process and the portrayal of an ideal feminine image. CW  parodies aesthetic conventions of photographic representation, in particular, advertising imagery.

On first glance, this image appears to be a pristine, even sterile, commercial photograph, its model flashing the clean smile fetishised by contemporary advertising as if culled from brand fashion catalogues and magazines.

Once the image has been divorced from its original function, the first thing that is observed is not a photo that shows a woman who has just washed her hair but one that shows a model undertaking her daily strenuous job and the strains and pressures that she has to maintain to keep the artificial facade of ideal beauty for the length of time a photoshoot takes.

Upon closer inspection the image, with its shallow depth of field, reveals the artificiality of the scenario.This is accentuated through use of the older subject and the minor imperfections that remain on her skin.

The creation of shaped shadow under the nose of the subject and under the cheeks and chin indicates placing the main light source above and directly behind the camera. The angle of the shoot appears to indicate that the photographer was positioned underneath the light source and is use particularly for creating glamour style shots as it flatters the complexion of older subjects as it emphasises wrinkles less than side lighting.

Using these various devices the subject is released from her commercial moorings and appears both ordinary and vulnerable. The image is technically precise recalling pre contemporary imagery and advertising, as well as invoking histories of art, photography and cinema.

The subversive nature of the image explores the use of photography as a medium in modern commercial advertising through questioning the stage sets of the art world and the publicity structures on which they rely.

The image’s provocative narrative draws the viewer’s attention to question photography’s integrity in a commercial orientated society: what it is, what it does and what it means at a time when it is so ubiquitous, covert and taken for granted. Through the image’s narrative the viewer is led to review their own stance with regard to why there was a need to use a picture of a semi-clothed woman as an aid to learning how to take a picture – and whether this concept remains in situ in today’s modern world.

Reference List

http://www.collection.whitney.org/object/27531

https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/1376

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/art-reviews/11581560/Christopher-Williams-Whitechapel-Gallery-review-infuriating.html

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/apr/28/dead-appealing-photographer-christopher-williams-whitechapel-gallery

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/christopher-williams/

Welcome To My Blog

Thank you for sharing your time with me.

Have a wonderful day.

 

Talking Pictures (15) – Genre: Conceptual Photography [Barbara Kruger]

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Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your body is a battleground)
1989

Welcome followers and visitors to my blog and the very latest update in my photography diary. The aim of this particular task is to gain, through research, an understanding of the scope of photography and its varied genres that will inform and support a personal project. Today’s topic is Conceptual Photography.

Conceptual Photography may be defined as;

  • a means to stage a false reality, or capture an idea.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-photography

  • being the idea (or concept) behind a work is more important than the finished art object.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-art

  • concerning theconcept of a photo, its message whether it be political, social commentary or an emotional outcry,
  • as possessingsome level of abstraction,
  • as not being an explicit example of a concept, but a general expression of an idea.

http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/photography/articles/39542.aspx

  • a means to stage a false reality, or capture an idea.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-photography

  • being the idea (or concept) behind a work is more important than the finished art object.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/c/conceptual-art

  • concerning theconcept of a photo, its message whether it be political, social commentary or an emotional outcry,
  • as possessingsome level of abstraction,
  • as not being an explicit example of a concept, but a general expression of an idea.

http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/photography/articles/39542.aspx

Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 17.58.20

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your body is a battleground)
1989

The image addresses media and politics in their native tongue: tabloid, sensational, authoritative, and direct.

The words and image merge the commercial and art worlds; their critical resonance eviscerates cultural hierarchies — everyone and everything is for sale.

This image is simultaneously art and protest. Though its origin is tied to a specific moment, the power of the work lies in the timelessness of its declaration.

The composition with its shallow depth of field and closely cropped possesses a red, black and white palette. The woman’s face, disembodied, split along a vertical axis in positive and negative exposures, and obscured by text, marks a stark divide.

The image is explosive possessing both political and social implications. This tension is emphasised by the woman’s strong silent staring facial expression and the direct manner in which she stares straight ahead out from the print, addressing the viewer frankly and provocatively through both her gaze and the words emblazoned across her face.

Reference List

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-kruger-barbara-artworks.htm#pnt_2

https://www.thebroad.org/art/barbara-kruger/untitled-your-body-battleground

 

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