Art – A World of Change!

© Fernand Khnopff, I Lock the Door Upon Myself, 1891

“Everything is temporary. Everything is bound to end.” 

Keren Ann

© Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Street, Dresden, 1908 (reworked 1919; dated on painting 1907)

Art “… makes invisible truths visible.” 

Sebastian Smee

© George Braque, Le Portugais (The Emigrant) Ceret [and Paris], autumn 1911-early 1912

Painting is one  of the oldest forms of expression. Art is both visual and philosophical. The emphasis varies from one era to another, but at any given moment they are combined, developed and exploited by individual artists. Impressionism was about artists seeing the world through their own eyes. Expressionism was about communicating feeling.

© Wassily Kandinsky, Composition VI, 1913

Such artistic ideas and their development have impacted upon, changed the direction and influenced the modern interpretation and contemporary outlook of what art represents. This being achieved through experimentation, a new analysis of artistic forms and shape. 

© Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, 1931

These innovations emphasized and revealed a fresh interpretation of the sense of movement, energy, colour, emotion and direction within Art. It may be said that Art’s contribution enables one to see in a much more humane and universal way.

© Jackson Pollock, Number 1 (Lavender Mist), 1950

“Without change, something sleeps inside us, and never wakens.” 

Duke Leo Atrides

© Roy Lichtenstein, Whaam!, 1963

“Artists are the real architects of change.”

William S. Burroughs

© Lucian Freud, Benefits Supervisor Sleeping (1995)

Click here to read and view more.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Fernand Khnopff, I Lock the Door Upon Myself, 1891

Source Credithttps://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/becoming-modern/symbolism/a/khnopff-i-lock-the-door-upon-myself-essay

Image Credit © Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Street, Dresden, 1908

Source Credithttps://www.moma.org/audio/playlist/1/59

Image Credit © George Braque, Le Portugais (The Emigrant) c.1911-1912

Source Credithttps://www.artsy.net/artwork/georges-braque-the-portuguese

Image Credit © Wassily Kandinsky, Composition VI, 1913

Source Credithttps://www.wassilykandinsky.net/work-35.php

Image Credit © Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, 1931

Source Credithttps://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/salvador-dali-the-persistence-of-memory-1931/

Image Credit © Jackson Pollock, Number 1 (Lavender Mist), 1950

Source Credithttps://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.55819.html

Image Credit © Roy Lichtenstein, Whaam!, 1963

Source Credithttps://www.artsy.net/artwork/roy-lichtenstein-whaam

Image Credit © Lucian Freud, Benefits Supervisor Sleeping (1995)

Source Credithttps://uk.phaidon.com/agenda/art/articles/2011/july/22/lucian-freud-by-the-benefits-supervisor-who-knew-him-best/

Art, Artists, Interaction and the Process of Change

© Cave Art, Bhimbetka,Madhya Pradesh, India, c. 30,000-28,000 BCE

“Art will never be able to exist without nature.” 

Pierre Bonnard

© The Story of Adam, Ashburnham, Pentateuch, c. 580-620 CE

Art and form are linked with function and nature, with feeling and seeing, with emotion and the relationship between the observed and men and women’s particular unique situations and particular environmental circumstances; and their reaction to and interaction with it.

© Sandro Botticelli, La Primavera (Spring), 1481 – 1482

“Art is about building a new foundation, not just laying something on top of what’s already there.”

Prince

© Frans Hals, The Banquet of the Officers of the St George Militia Company, 1616

Art is constantly evolving and has been ever since the very beginning when prehistoric artists began to paint on the walls of caves.

© J.M.W. Turner, Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway, 1844

That which has changed, through each differing age, is the way in which artists perceive and interpret art’s purpose within the world that surrounds them.

© Roger de La Fresnaye, The Conquest of the Air, 1913

“Change is the constant, the signal for rebirth, the egg of the phoenix.” 

Christina Baldwin

© Arshile Gorky, Water of the Flowery Mill,1944

Click here to read and view more.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Cave Art, Bhimbetka,Madhya Pradesh, India, c. 30,000-28,000 BCE

Source Credithttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/journey-oldest-cave-paintings-world-180957685/

Image Credit © The Story of Adam, Ashburnham, Pentateuch, c. 580-620 CE

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashburnham_Pentateuch#/media/File:AshburnPenatuchtFolio006rCainAbel.jpg

Image Credit © Sandro Botticelli, La Primavera (Spring), 1481 – 1482

Source Credithttps://artsandculture.google.com/asset/la-primavera-spring/yQER9P-WIU2k9A

Image Credit © Frans Hals, The Banquet of the Officers of the St George Militia Company, 1616

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Banquet_of_the_Officers_of_the_St_George_Militia_Company_in_1616#/media/File:Frans_Hals_-_Banket_van_de_officieren_van_de_Sint-Joris-Doelen.jpg

Image Credit © J.M.W. Turner, Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway, 1844

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain,_Steam_and_Speed_%E2%80%93_The_Great_Western_Railway

Image Credit © Roger de La Fresnaye, The Conquest of the Air, 1913

Source Credithttps://www.moma.org/collection/works/79181

Image Credit © Arshile Gorky, Water of the Flowery Mill,1944

Source Credithttps://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/56.205.1/

Art is nothing more than a way of seeing! What the hell does that mean?

Cave Paintings Bhimbetka, India, c. 30,000 BCE

“Art doesn’t begin with a brush and a palette, but with the artist’s ability to perceive life. One has to learn how to live before one can learn how to paint.” 

Dean Mitchell

Paintings from Tomb of Sarenput II, at Aswan, Egypt, c. 1897 – 1878 BCE

“To be conscious that we are perceiving or thinking is to be conscious of our own existence.”

Aristotle

The Siren vase. Photograph: © Trustees of the British Museum, c. 480-470 BCE

“If one learns something too well, it will get in the way of ones perception of reality.” 

Darby Bannard

Giotto di Bondone, The Kiss of Judas, 1306 ACE

Roger Eliot Fry claimed that with the development of language human’s began to perceive things in terms of concepts.

El Greco, Opening of the fifth seal (The vision of Saint John the Divine), c.1610 ACE

With the use of vocabulary such as “eye”, “neck”, and “leg” that appeared to concentrate human’s intellectual attention on each separate portion of the object seen.

Jan Vermeer, The Art of Painting, c.1667 ACE

In so doing this prevented men and women from taking a broader view of perceiving the whole at a glance.

Josep -Marie Vien, The Cupid Seller, 1763 ACE

“The universe is change; life is ones perception of it.” 

Marcus Aurelius

Francisco Goya, The Third of May 1808

Over time it is artists’ outlooks and limitations which have changed and not the form. Naturally the process within every age, the “seeing-eye” observes in a way which is partly determined by the prevailing changing conditions, environment and the technology present.

Joseph Mallord William Turner, Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth, 1842

“Every creative act involves… a new innocence of perception, liberated from the cataract of accepted belief.” 

Arthur Koestler

Claude Monet, Impression Sunrise, 1872

“Opting for one perception eliminates all others.” 

Simone Bingemer

Paul Klee, Rising Sun, 1907

Click here to read and view more.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Cave Paintings Bhimbetka, India, c. 30,000 BCE

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_paintings_in_India

Image Credit © Paintings from Tomb of Sarenput II, at Aswan, Egypt, c. 1897 – 1878 BCE

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_of_ancient_Egypt#/media/File:Aswan,_Egypt_WestBankTombs_2007jan15._14_byDanielCsorfoly.JPG

Image Credit © The Siren vase. Photograph: © Trustees of the British Museum, c. 480-470 BCE

SourceCredithttps://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2014/aug/14/top-10-ancient-greek-artworks-jonathan-jones

Image Credit © Giotto di Bondone, The Kiss of Judas, 1306 ACE

Source Credithttps://learnodo-newtonic.com/famous-renaissance-paintings

Image Credit © El Greco, Opening of the fifth seal (The vision of Saint John the Divine), c.1610 ACE

Source Credithttps://www.wikiart.org/en/el-greco/opening-of-the-fifth-seal-the-vision-of-saint-john-the-divine

Image Credit © Jan Vermeer, The Art of Painting, c.1667 ACE

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Art_of_Painting#/media/File:Jan_Vermeer_-_The_Art_of_Painting_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

Image Credit © Josep -Marie Vien, The Cupid Seller, 1763 ACE

Source Credithttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Cupid_Seller_1763_Joseph-Marie_Vien.jpg

Image Credit © Francisco Goya, The Third of May, 1808

SourceCredithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Third_of_May_1808#/media/File:El_Tres_de_Mayo,_by_Francisco_de_Goya,_from_Prado_thin_black_margin.jpg

Image Credit © Joseph Mallord William Turner, Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth, 1842

Source Credithttps://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/turner-snow-storm-steam-boat-off-a-harbours-mouth-n00530

Image Credit © Claude Monet, Impression Sunrise, 1872

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impression,_Sunrise#/media/File:Monet_-_Impression,_Sunrise.jpg

Image Credit © Paul Klee, Rising Sun, 1907

Source Credithttps://www.wikiart.org/en/paul-klee/rising-sun-1907

Art – Lost and Found. Fact or Fiction?

“Design invariably, from the simplified to the most complex, has meaning. Design is metaphorical. Design is informed thought or emotion, an allegory of that which is within us.”

© Megaloceros with line of dots, Lascaux, France

Attributed W. Embler 

“Primitive men and women were content with a symbol, a mere diagram of their mind-image and that as they merged from primitiveness the diagram became more realistic and less decorative.”

Eric Newton

© Grotta dei Cervi, Italy, c. 6,000-5,000 B.C.E.

“Artists find that the form or shape of things externally corresponds, in some strange way, to the movements of their mental and emotional life.” 

Graham Collier

© Bhimbetka Rock Shelters, India, c. 28,000 B.C.E.

Human development in painting and sculpture, especially the understanding of art and form is definitely not a function of a diagrammatic mind-image. It is a descriptive record observed with the swiftness of a camera’s snapshot.

© Pillar, Göbekli Tepe, Turkey

It would appear almost at some point as if in a momentary lapse as though civilization had somehow been robbed of their powers of “seeing” and observing. In some unexplained unknown fashion the later activities of human thinking and feeling appear to have been deadened sensory visualization. 

© Mary lloyd Jones, Lost language, (Date Unstated)

It is only after an inward looking struggle lasting many centuries were humans enabled to perceive and observe with the same penetrating eye possessed by prehistoric artists, although the basic forms remained identical.

© Abdoulaye Aboudia Diarrassouba, Untitled, (Date Unstated)

“Form is a revelation of essence.” 

Meister Johann Eckhart

© Paul Klee, Death and Fire, 1940

“True art takes note not merely of form but also of what lies behind.” 

Mahatma Gandhi

© Anselm Kiefer, Velimir Chlebnikov, 1990

Click here to read and view more.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Megaloceros with line of dots, Lascaux, France

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascaux

Image Credit © Grotta dei Cervi, Italy, c. 6,000-5,000 B.C.E.

Source Credithttps://explorethearchive.com/oldest-cave-paintings

Image Credit © Bhimbetka Rock Shelters, India, c. 28,000 B.C.E.

Source Credithttps://explorethearchive.com/oldest-cave-paintings

Image Credit © Pillar, Göbekli Tepe, Turkey

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6bekli_Tepe

Image Credit © Mary lloyd Jones, Lost language, (Date Unstated)

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Lloyd_Jones

Image Credit © Abdoulaye Aboudia Diarrassouba, Untitled, (Date Unstated)

Source Credithttp://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/2017/modern-contemporary-african-l17801.html

Image Credit © Paul Klee, Death and Fire, 1940

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_and_Fire

Image Credit © Anselm Kiefer, Velimir Chlebnikov, 1990

Source Credithttp://whitecube.com/artists/artist/anselm_kiefer

Art, Purpose and the Essence of Awareness.

© Mary Lloyd Jones, Cwm Rheidol, 1934

“Awareness requires living in the here and now, and not in the elsewhere, the past or the future.”

Eric Berne

© Brendan Burns, Twilight, 2018

Previously I have discussed the various purposes of Art and found that artistic functions are not mutually exclusive and may overlap.

© Valerie Ganz, Leaving Six Bells, (Date Unstated)

“One has to immerse oneself in one’s surroundings and intensely study nature or one’s subject to understand how to recreate it.” 

Paul Cezanne

© Martyn Jones, Voyage – Westbury 2014

Art from the most simple to the most complex has meaning. Art is a fusion of metaphors and allegories that reveal hidden meanings from within artists and the observer. Nothing  exists in nature that is not an inherent constituent or characteristic of humans themselves. 

© Christine Kinsey, Guardians of a Spiritual Memory 2, (Series 1)

“Art is a form of supremely delicate awareness… meaning at-oneness, the state of being at one with the object.” 

D. H. Lawrence

© Robert Alwyn Hughes, Dowlais Top No.1, 1959

Whatever exists in the natural world exists in men and women in the guise of their awareness of its existence, and all that artists can attempt to do is search for a means and a mode of expressing, stretching the boundaries of; and, interpreting that awareness.

© Shani Rhys James, Out of the Doll’s House, 2015

“Awareness is something apart from, and different from, all that of which we are aware: thoughts, emotions, images, sensations, desires and memory. Awareness is the ground in which the mind’s contents manifest themselves; they appear in it and disappear once again.” 

Arthur Deikman

© Iwan Bala, Bronze Age, Iron Age , 1998

Click here to read more.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Mary Lloyd Jones, Cwm Rheidol, 1934

SourceCredithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Lloyd_Jones#/media/File:Cwm_Rheidol.jpg

Image Credit © Brendan Burns, Twilight, 2018

Source Credithttps://www.artsy.net/artwork/brendan-stuart-burns-twilight

Image Credit © Valerie Ganz, Leaving Six Bells, (Date Unstated)

Source Credithttps://valerieganz.co.uk/product/leaving-six-bells/

Image Credit © Martyn Jones, Voyage – Westbury 2014

Source Credithttps://www.saatchiart.com/art/Painting-Voyage-Westbury-2014/689722/1929527/view

Image Credit © Christine Kinsey, Guardians of a Spiritual Memory 2, (Series 1)

Source Credithttp://www.christinekinsey.com/work/ceidwaid-y-cofion-ysbrydol-2-cyfres-1-guardians-of-a-spiritual-memory-2-series-1/

Image Credit © Robert Alwyn Hughes, Dowlais Top No.1, 1959

Source Credithttps://artuk.org/discover/artworks/dowlais-top-no-1-178140

Image Credit © Shani Rhys James, Out of the Doll’s House, 2015

Source Credithttps://www.culturecolony.com/news/out-dolls-house-shani-rhys-james

Image Credit © Iwan Bala, Bronze Age, Iron Age , 1998

Source Credithttps://blouinartsalesindex.com/auctions/Iwan-Bala-2964896/null

Art x Art = Sex / Sex(Art x Art) = Evolution

Prehistoric Rock Art, Tassil-n- Ajjer, PhotoCcredit: africanrockart.org

“We are all born sexual creatures …”

Marilyn Monroe

Prehistoric Rock Art, India

“Sex and art are the same thing.” 

Pablo Picasso

Venus of Willendorf, Austria, c. 28,000 BCE – 25,000 BCE

“For male and female alike, the bodies of the other sex are messages signalling what one must do, they are glowing signifiers of ones own necessities.” 

John Updike

Aboriginal rock art at Nourlangie, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia

It has been argued that the ability of the human brain by far exceeds what was needed for survival in the ancestral environment. One evolutionary psychology explanation for this is that the human brain and associated traits (such as artistic ability and creativity) are the human equivalent of the peacock’s tail.

Cave painting at Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil

“It is sexual energy which governs the structure of human feeling and thinking.” 

Wilhelm Reich

Prehistoric Hand Painting, Cueva de las Manos, Argentina, c. 11,000 – 7,000 BCE

“Sex is a spiritual experience.”

Deepak Chopra

 The purpose of the male peacock’s extravagant tail has been argued to be to attract females and indicated the fitness of the particular creature. According to this theory superior execution of art was evolutionary important because it attracted mates.

Running Horned Woman, 6,000-4,000 B.C.E., pigment on rock, Tassili n’Ajjer, Algeria

“Sex appeal is the keynote of our civilization.” 

Henri Bergson

Rock Painting, Bison, Altamira, Spain

“All art is erotic.” 

Gustav Klimt

Cave Painting, Male Phallus, Akyapı (AlaKapı) Caves, Turkey

Reference

(Dutton, Denis. 2003. “Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology” in “The Oxford Handbook for Aesthetics”. Oxford University Press.

Click here to read more.

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Rock Art, Tassil-n- Ajjer, PhotoCcredit: africanrockart.org

Source Credithttps://www.amusingplanet.com/2016/03/the-prehistoric-rock-art-of-tassili.html

Image Credit © Prehistoric Rock Art, India

Source Credithttps://www.harappa.com/blog/prehistoric-rock-paintings-and-ancient-indus-motifs-0

Image Credit © Venus of Willendorf, Austria, c. 28,000 BCE – 25,000 BCE

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus_of_Willendorf

Image Credit © Aboriginal rock art at Nourlangie, Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia

Source Credithttps://www.touropia.com/prehistoric-cave-paintings/

Image Credit © Cave painting at Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_painting#/media/File:Serra_da_Capivara_-_Several_Paintings_2b.jpg

Image Credit © Prehistoric Hand Painting, Cueva de las Manos, Argentina, c. 11,000 – 7,000 BCE

Source Credithttps://www.touropia.com/prehistoric-cave-paintings/

Image Credit © Running Horned Woman, 6,000-4,000 B.C.E., pigment on rock, Tassili n’Ajjer, Algeria

Source Credithttps://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/global-prehistory-ap/paleolithic-mesolithic-neolithic/a/running-horned-woman-tassili-najjer

Image Credit © Rock Painting, Bison, Altamira, Spain

Source Credithttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/prehistoric-cave-paintings-open-again-just-today-180949922/

Image Credit © Akyapı (AlaKapı) Caves, Turkey – Girginer S, Durukan M. Prehistoric Paintings in the Akyapı Cave in Mersin/Gülnar

Source Credithttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5687224/

Art – Shares, Informs, Provokes! True or False?

“The purpose of Art is to create enthusiasm.”

© Theaster Gates, Civil Tapestry 4, 2011

Pablo Picasso

© Tania Bruguera, Tatlin’s Whisper #5, 2008

Art shares awareness of a large variety of social causes cancer, human-trafficking, human rights, abuse of the elderly, the environment and pollution etc..

© Suzanne Lacy, The Crystal Quilt, 1985–7

“Creation always involves building upon something else. There is no art that doesn’t reuse. And there will be less art if every reuse is taxed by the appropriator.”

Lawrence Lessig

© Marina DeBris, Old Glory, (Date Unstated)

“The purpose of art is to reflect new emerging values and to define the new heroes and heroines so that people can absorb them into their perceptions.”

Edward de Bono

© Jeremy Deller, The History of the World, 1997–2004

Art informs  within the purposes of propaganda and commercialism and thus can be used to subtly influence popular conceptions or mood. In a similar way, art that tries to sell a product also influences mood and emotion. 

© Jim Fitzpatrick, Che Guevara,1967

“The purpose of art is to subtly manipulate the viewer into a particular emotional or psychological response toward a particular idea or object.” 

Roland Gerard Barthes

© Banksy, Kalandia Checkpoint, West Bank, (Date Unstated)

“If anything, art is about morals, about our belief in humanity. Without that, there simply is no art.”

Ai Weiwei

© Ai Weiwei, Law of the Journey, 2017-18

Click here to read and view more.h

https://goffjamesart.wordpress.com

Image Credit © Theaster Gates, Civil Tapestry 4, 2011

Source Credithttps://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/theaster-gates-17216

Image Credit © Tania Bruguera, Tatlin’s Whisper #5, 2008

Source Credithttps://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/bruguera-tatlins-whisper-5-t12989

Image Credit © Suzanne Lacy, The Crystal Quilt, 1985–7

Source Credithttps://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/lacy-the-crystal-quilt-l03198

Image Credit © Marina DeBris, Old Glory, (Date Unstated)

Source Credithttps://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/sep/13/trashion-designer-marina-debris-turns-ocean-rubbish-into-high-end-outfits-in-pictures

Image Credit © Jeremy Deller, The History of the World, 1997–2004

Source Credithttps://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/deller-the-history-of-the-world-t12868

Image Credit © Jim Fitzpatrick, Che Guevara,1967

Source Credithttps://www.jimfitzpatrick.com/product-category/che-guevara-poster-print/

Image Credit © Banksy, Kalandia Checkpoint, West Bank, (Date Unstated)

Source Credithttps://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/01/how-can-artists-lead-dramatic-social-change/

Image Credit © Ai Weiwei, Law of the Journey, 2017-18

Source Credithttps://mymodernmet.com/ai-weiwei-law-of-the-journey/