Form as an extension of creation and content in Art; and, that which lies behind it. What the hell is that then?

“Form is a revelation of essence.” 

Meister Johann Eckhart

Man from Brno,
CzechRepublic,
c.30,000 – 25,000 BCE

“Creation is only the projection into form of that which already exists.” 

The Bhagavad Gita

Stag Hunt, floor mosaic, Pella, Greece, c. 300 BCE

Form within Art, in essence, is delicate and sensitive; and, in so being provides vitality to the mode, context, content and particular needs of the artist. If form remains so and critically obeys the criteria undertaken an astonishing realism and expressive freedom can be captured. 

Bodhisattva Padmapani (detail), Cave 1, Ajanta, India, c.700 ACE

Form can be mathematically precise if its primary goal and virtues are to encapsulate simplicity, balanced design, outline clarity and clear organized compositional arrangement.

 Dish, East Persia, c. 1000 ACE

Imagine for a moment that one is trekking over a vast expanse of desert terrain which expands outward and away from one and stretching as far as one can see. In the far distance an object emerges and appears at the edge of the horizon. 

It is dusk and in the enveloping evening darkness one is unable to identify what the image is, observe its true outline shape, colour, its textured surface or from which material it might be constructed from.

Since there are no other objects within this particular sparse environment, such as trees or people and one doesn’t know how far away it is; one is unable to make judgements with regard to its size. 

Henry Moore, Animal Head, 1951

However, in spite of this, a part of the object’s elemental character will have impressed itself into the psyche and one will have been enabled to make comparisons with regard to its height relative to its width.

As one approaches the the object and increasingly recognizes all of its constructive elements and qualities, one can engraft additional impressions and information until the entire concept of the object’s character is fairly complete. 

However one’s original impression – comparison of height with width – will have conveyed an important part of the object’s character.

Pieter Brueghel The Elder,The Harvesters, 1565 ACE

Artists whether they be Realists or Abstractionists create artistic forms that embrace or challenge individual viewer’s experiences and expectations.

Jackson Pollock, autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950 ACE

“Painting around an object will help one look at ones subjects in a new way – as shapes and spaces…”

Mary Todd Beam

Paul Klee, Sunset, 1930

“When the whole and the parts are seen at once, as mutually producing and explaining each other, as unity in multeity, there results shapeliness.” 

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Arshile Gorky, Betrothal 1, 1947

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Image Credit © Man from Brno, Czech Republic, c.30,000 – 25,000 BCE

Source Credithttps://linipin1486.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/screen-shot-2015-07-07-at-20-11-58.png

Image Credit © Stag Hunt, floor mosaic, Pella, Greece, c. 300 BCE

Source Credithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stag_Hunt_Mosaic#/media/File:Deer_hunt_mosaic_from_Pella.jpg

Image Credit © Bodhisattva Padmapani (detail), Cave 1, Ajanta, India, c.700 ACE

Source Credithttps://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/art-asia/south-asia/buddhist-art2/a/the-caves-of-ajanta

Image Credit ©  Dish, East Persia, c. 1000 ACE

SourceCredithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_art#/media/File:Iran_orientale_o_asia_centrale,_coppa,_x_sec_02.JPG

Image Credit © Henry Moore, Animal Head, 1951

Source Credithttps://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/moore-animal-head-t02271

Image Credit © Pieter Brueghel The Elder,The Harvesters, 1565 ACE

SourceCredithttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Harvesters_(painting)#/media/File:Pieter_Bruegel_the_Elder-_The_Harvesters_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

Image Credit © Paul Klee, Sunset, 1930

Source Credithttps://www.artic.edu/artworks/61608/sunset

Image Credit © Arshile Gorky, Betrothal 1, 1947

Source Credithttps://www.moca.org/collection/work/betrothal-i-2